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Toshiba Portege Z830
Toshiba's Portege Z830 is cheaper, lighter, and better equipped than Apple's 13" MacBook Air

Manufacturers are still trying to work out final details on pricing for Intel-based Ultrabooks, but the devices are on the way. For those that like the form-factor and weight on Apple's highly popular MacBook Air range, but can't be bothered with Apple’s pricing or OS X, Toshiba is serving up a fine alternative with the Portege Z830. 

Toshiba has worked some serious magic on the Portege Z830 as it manages to incorporate a 13.3" display (1366x768) and second generation Intel Core processors into a frame weighing in at under 2.5 pounds. Part of the low weight can be attributed to the Portege Z830's magnesium alloy body.

Although Toshiba won't tell us how fast the processors are in the Portege Z830, the specs are quite amazing. It will come with a 128GB SSD, backlit and spill-resistant keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, one USB 3.0 port, GbE port, Secure Digital reader, HDMI-out, and stereo speakers.

According to Engadget, the notebook features an 8-cell battery, can be equipped with up to 6GB of DDR3 memory, and will have an optional Core i7 processor upgrade available.

"The Portégé Z830 Series sets a new standard for thin and light systems, not just in portability, but also in affordability for such cutting-edge designs," said Carl Pinto, vice president of product development, Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc., Digital Products Division. "Toshiba's engineering achievements and expert craftsmanship have resulted in a brilliant and fully thought-through innovation that exceeds expectations, perfect for both mobile business professionals and consumers." 

And keeping with Intel's mandate, the 0.63"-thin Portege Z830 will start at under $1,000 (we're guessing $999) when it launches later this year. That would make the lighter, better-spec'd Toshiba Ultrabook $300 cheaper than the entry-level 13" MacBook Air.



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RE: Sorry...
By MrPete123 on 9/1/2011 3:19:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
That's why they're so fast. DMA beats PIO mode every time, period.


Probably true, however this is why Thunderbolt is so insecure as well. Unlike USB, any device that plugs into a Thunderbolt port gets full read/write access to the system's memory. A device with buggy firmware could compromise the stability of the system...or heaven forbid a malicious person with a device could steal or plant data by merely plugging into an external Thunderbolt port.

Another problem with Thunderbolt is the price... it's MUCH more expensive for OEMs to put a Thunderbolt controller than USB 3.0. There are certainly good reasons for not supporting Thunderbolt, and it will likely remain a niche port unless Microsoft decides to bless it.


RE: Sorry...
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 9/1/2011 5:12:11 PM , Rating: 2
As soon as Intel puts Thunderbolt support into the southbridge it'll get massive adoption. Intel is one of the few companies in a position to create a new standard and push it without much effort. They effectively dominate the processor, integrated video, chipset, and controllers on over 80% of the PC market. If they want to put thunderbird on every system for pennies they can do it and nobody can stop them. Their reference boards and chipsets are the standard for every other OEM to stick in their budget systems. Only the high end hardware makers like ASUS or ABIT tend to tweak and fiddle with the motherboards and chipsets to get the best of the best in one package. Everyone else buys in bulk the Intel reference design and ships to the masses.


RE: Sorry...
By Argon18 on 9/1/2011 7:23:08 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, Thunderbolt is exactly as "insecure" as eSATA, SATA, PATA, SCSI, and SAS. No more and no less.


"Young lady, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" -- Homer Simpson














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