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Uh oh, Nokia has been hacked...
The extent of the damage appears limited

Nokia Oyj. (HEL:NOK1V), currently in the midst of trying to push out Windows Phone 7 product, suffered an embarrassment when its developers website, developers.nokia.com, lost customers' personal information.

The extent of the damage appears limited, according to Nokia.  For most customers, only their email address was lost (so watch out for phishing
!).  For an estimated 7 percent of customers "either birth dates, homepage URL or usernames for AIM, ICQ, MSN, Skype or Yahoo" were also lost. More sensitive information, however, like passwords and usernames, was not in the affected database and remains safe.

Nokia writes:

You may have seen reports or received an email from us regarding a recent security breach on this developer.nokia.com/community discussion forum.

During our ongoing investigation of the incident we have discovered that a database table containing developer forum members' email addresses has been accessed, by exploiting a vulnerability in the bulletin board software that allowed an SQL Injection attack. Initially we believed that only a small number of these forum member records had been accessed, but further investigation has identified that the number is significantly larger.

The database table records includes members’ email addresses and, for fewer than 7% who chose to include them in their public profile, either birth dates, homepage URL or usernames for AIM, ICQ, MSN, Skype or Yahoo. However, they do not contain sensitive information such as passwords or credit card details and so we do not believe the security of forum members’ accounts is at risk. Other Nokia accounts are not affected.

We are not aware of any misuse of the accessed data, but we are communicating with affected forum members, though we believe the only potential impact to them may be unsolicited email. Nokia apologizes for this incident.

Though the initial vulnerability was addressed immediately, we have now taken the developer community website offline as a precautionary measure, while we conduct further investigations and security assessments. We hope to get the site back online as soon as possible and will post developments here in the meantime.

If you have any questions on this, please contact Nokia.developer-discussions-support@nokia.com.

The Nokia Developer website team.

Nokia is hardly the first major online entity to be hacked by SQL injection, and is unlikely to be the last.  SQL injection (affectionately nicknamed a "Little Bobby Tables" attack by web-comicXKCD), relies on sending malformed queries to a publicly available SQL database hence "injecting" unauthorized commands.  To succeed the attacker must gain physical access to the database (the ability to query it) and the database engine must lack more advanced code to handle malformed queries.  

SQL injection attacks are very preventable -- either by denying public access and/or by properly coding your database.  However, recent years have seen countless SQL injection attacks.  In 2009 Kapersky and the Australian federal police were both hacked via SQL injection.  In 2010The Pirate Bay was hacked via SQL injection.  This year hackers employed the method to penetrate several databases [1][2][3] of Japanese electronics giant Sony Corp. (TYO:6758
).

Thus far Anonymous and other familiar "hacktivists" have not claimed responsibility for the attack.  It is unknown why the hacker(s) responsible targeted the Finnish phone maker.



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This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Hmm.
By NellyFromMA on 8/29/2011 10:51:46 AM , Rating: 2
I think for the most part, this happens because corporations don't want to invest in legact updates to software which has probably seen a lot of bolt-on / iteration-based 'revisions' over the last 5 - 10 years or so.
The knowledge of the 'average' PC user as well as the multitude of users in general in addition to the lower-age entry level at which people start becoming interested and perhaps savvy with technology has pros and cons.
Leaders / management at corporations probably hadn't been presented compelling enough arguements about fixing these 'it still works' technologies because

A) In a 'I didn't do it' corporate world, no one wants to be held accountable, so the developers probably aren't interested in highlighting security flaws of sensitive data to those who aren't privvy to the issue

and

B) If the developer was sensible and thought of this, it may be an exceptionally difficult conversation conveying ROI, or really, loss minimization in this situation, to your boss or manager, especially when you start talking about company reputation and how something you worked on may have put it at risk.

Sensible and/or knowledgable management, if you are lucky enough to have that directly over you, is key in those situations.

It's easy for people here to comment about how this is 'another example of lazy devs' but honestly, 5 years ago, SQL Injection wasn't even terminalogy you could easily explain to anyone outside of the development world without getting into an entire dissertation and immediately lose who you're speaking to in technical jargon.

In a way, you can thank these companies for highlighting these issues at their expense (as well as the end-users unfortunately) so now, SQL Injection is a little more known as a term in itself.

So, thanks lulz and the like? Idk about all that crap, but I guess every cloud has some sort of silver-lining. And yes, I know no one is being blamed / taking credit for this attack. I just mean in general.




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