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  (Source: onlinemarketingstrategynews.com)
One in six UK children are failing to read even one book per month

The internet has undoubtedly changed the way many people live their lives by offering information and convenience at rapid speeds, and new studies prove that these lifestyle changes are becoming more ingrained than ever -- especially in those who were born using it.

For instance, Beloit College, which is located in Wisconsin, released its annual Mindset List yesterday to remind teachers that college freshman born in the early 1990's see the world in a different way. The list, which states that the Web is now older than incoming freshman, offers 75 references as to how these college freshman think. For example, they think of the internet retailer when hearing the word "Amazon" instead of the South American river. Other examples, which are likely attributed to a generation gap rather than the internet, are that incoming freshman do not even know what the OJ Simpson murder trial and subsequent acquittal was about.

"Hmm, I know there was some scandal about him," said Alex Keesey, 18, a freshman at Beloit College. "I think it was robbery or murder, maybe both."

Now, a new survey further proves how the internet has changed the minds of those growing up with it. The new poll shows that UK youngsters born in the age of the internet are reading websites like Facebook and Twitter more than they're reading books.

The survey, which was conducted by the British charity National Literacy Trust, consisted of 18,141 children from ages eight to 17. It found that one in six children are failing to read even one book per month.

Instead, UK children are ditching literature for social networking websites like Facebook and Twitter. According to the survey, the older end of the ages eight to 17 spectrum were significantly more likely to have not read a book in the past month than the younger children.

In response to these findings, Secretary for Education Michael Gove has proposed the challenge that all children at age 11 should read 50 books per year.


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RE: I read...
By ShaolinSoccer on 8/24/2011 4:30:54 PM , Rating: 2
Are you going to keep her locked up in the house until she's an adult? Lay a good foundation but try not to overdo it or she may end up hating you...


RE: I read...
By MrBlastman on 8/24/2011 5:18:18 PM , Rating: 2
Absolutely not. Part of the reasoning behind blocking Facebook and Twitter is to encourage just that--to look beyond the confines of her own home and experience the world in person. No need to hide behind a computer to converse with friends when you can chat or hang out with them.

As a parent, I'm not her friend. I'm her Parent. It is up to I to determine what I feel would be beneficial to her in a positive way while growing up and what might not be. She might experience these mediums outside my home like I did with my friends NES (my parents would never let me have one), but in the end it helped me better socialize with those around me rather than remain inside surrounded by electronics.


RE: I read...
By ShaolinSoccer on 8/24/2011 7:55:20 PM , Rating: 2
Ya, I totally agree with you. But wait until the teenage years. Most of us are old enough to remember how we were (how stupid we were) in our teenage years and that is why we try our best to make sure our kids don't turn out the same way. But no matter what, they have to learn on their own and hopefully respect you and your wife enough to make the right decisions. And even if they make the wrong decisions, hopefully they will still turn out OK like we did lol...

You're a good dad. The world needs more people like you!


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