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NASA's SLS project in jeopardy, as US voters and politicians grow weary of political issues

NASA retired the space shuttle fleet and faces mounting problems related to the 2010 NASA Authorization Bill alongside other budget issues that have angered politicians and citizens. 

U.S. lawmakers are growing more concerned that NASA administrators could have saved jobs and tax payer money as the mismanaged space launch system (SLS) helps usher the U.S. space program into a new era. 

NASA has been accused of stalling for the sake of trying to end the SLS program, with the U.S. space agency also conducting its own internal review of the SLS program. 

"Due to unjustified, sometimes substantial future cost savings, the team views each program estimate as optimistic," noted Booz Allen Hamilton, as the U.S. space agency continues to face pressure to move forward. 

Once completed, the SLS is expected to be a heavy launch vehicle able to enter low-Earth orbit (LEO). Specifically, the new SLS rocket would be powered by Ares I and space shuttle engines, though there has been added call for liquid-fueled strap-on boosters. 

The finished report was expected earlier in the month, but NASA said it still needs additional time before it can be released. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and several other senators don't believe a private sector competition to develop the future SLS will just lead to other future delays. 

NASA has about $1.78 billion set aside for the SLS program during fiscal 2011, but it ends on September 30. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson, the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee ranking Republican, claims NASA's problems with SLS have led to as many as 3,000 job losses since the shuttle program ended.

Senators are still unsure how to help NASA unify its Ares I and Ares V space vehicle plans, after the U.S. space agency ended the Constellation program. SpaceX, Boeing, and two other contractors are currently working on U.S. government-funded projects to develop new shuttle systems able to ferry astronauts and supplies into space. 

If there is so much money still up for grabs, representative states will make a strong push to keep NASA focused on short-term projects.  Until then, it'll be up to the Russians to help take NASA astronauts and supplies into space, though that costly alternative 
now faces its own problems.



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Dailytech FUD
By Ramtech on 8/30/2011 7:53:41 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
1st progress failure since...
By Amiga500 on 8/25/2011 8:32:23 AM , Rating: 2 ever. Started launching in 1998 and this is the first to go awry. I would think it is not a fundamental problem, and more one of quality control. RE: 1st progress failure since...

By jhb116 on 8/25/2011 8:54:47 AM , Rating: 4 Very true - and there there is statement about dismay over spending $63M - really - $63M is a bargain compared to the estimated $1B for each Shuttle launch. Don't get me wrong - I don't like not having a manned space program but the Shuttle program was to expensive.




RE: Dailytech FUD
By Ramtech on 8/30/2011 8:06:28 AM , Rating: 1
why i cant edit my comments?

Why is Dailytech spreading such lies


RE: Dailytech FUD
By MrBlastman on 8/30/2011 12:20:13 PM , Rating: 2
On Dailytech, you are expected to take pride and exhibit diligence in your postings. As such, once you press the post button, there is no editing. No ninja edits. Everything is set in stone. You can't hide once you say something.

As for Dailytech spreading lies... All I see is you quoting things other people have said. How is Dailytech spreading lies?

It looks to me that at the most all it is doing is providing an open forum for its members to discuss issues and state their opinions.

From my vantage point though, it looks to me that you think you know better. Tell us, oh great wise one, tell us what the real truth is. Enlighten us all.


RE: Dailytech FUD
By jhb116 on 8/30/2011 7:33:01 PM , Rating: 2
What is your point? Are you questioning $63M for launch support to the ISS? That isn't out of the realm of possibility given "tourists" have paid $10M for launch so I'm not sure what your issue is with that.

Or are you questioning my estimate of $1B per shuttle launch? You might want to do some research because the shuttle program cost many billions of $ to support each year and was lucky to launch 6 times per year. It is likely that the true cost were more than $1B per flight. With the amount of refurbishment that was required after each shuttle flight - we would be better served with a disposable vehicle or significantly upgrade shuttle.

As with the other commenter on your post - could you enlighten us with your wisdom so we can debate points?


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