backtop


Print 22 comment(s) - last by Pirks.. on Aug 22 at 2:57 PM

Tablets grew significantly even without the iPad

Apple is flying high thanks to very successful products like the iPad and the iPhone. These products are selling in droves and are a huge part of the reason the Apple is so financially stable. The latest numbers from DisplaySearch are in and Apple has ousted HP from the top spot in market share.

It’s worth noting right up front that DisplaySearch is adding the iPad in with Apple’s computers to get the numbers. According to the research firm, Apple shipped over 13.5 million mobile PCs in Q2 2011. That works out to a 136% YoY growth rate and puts Apple ahead of HP. Apples market share was 21.1% and HP's share is 15%. HP shipped 9.7 million units. Shipments of the Apple iPad alone were 10.7 million. 

Overall, tablet shipments are helping the computer industry. Shipments of tablet PCs were up almost 70% from Q1 2011 and up over 400% from Q2 2010. Almost 16.4 million tablets shipped over all in Q2. Notebook shipments were down 2% compared to Q1 2011, but they were up 2% from Q2 2010. Global mobile computer shipments including notebook and tablet PCs reached 64.4 million units in Q2. That is 10% growth rate from Q1 2011 and 28% growth compared to 2010.

“Preliminary results show a second consecutive quarter of Y/Y shipment growth rate decline,” said Richard Shim, Senior Analyst for DisplaySearch. “While part of the Y/Y decline can be attributed to a strong first half of 2010, the rising tablet PC shipment growth rate begins to point to notebook PC shipment cannibalization.”

In notebook shipments, Samsung and Dell grew the fastest with 44% and 33% respective growth year over year. Dell also saw growth on a quarter-to-quarter basis with 27% growth.

Taking Apple out of the equation shows that PC shipments still grew globally. Not counting iPads the year over year tablet growth rate was 25% and non-iPad tablet shipments totaled 5.6 million units. 



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Shipments
By name99 on 8/18/2011 5:38:36 PM , Rating: 3
"In the short-term, shipment figures suffer the problem you cite. But over a longer timeframe it averages out. If a retailer orders too many shipments of a product this quarter, next quarter it will reduce its order of shipments substantially until it works through the excess inventory."

Yeah, I'm sure that will happen to all those unsold TouchPads --- they'll hang around at Best Buy for the next four years until they are all sold. People don't want to buy them now, but who knows, when compared with iPad3, they may sell like hot cakes.

Why don't you just admit that the economic model you're describing only makes sense for static products; and is largely irrelevant to a market as rapidly changing as that for tablets?

As for "Retailers are pretty reluctant to give out actual sales figures", no-one is asking Best Buy to give us a store by store breakdown of what is selling. What is being asked is that journalists not be gullible fools. The issue is not what BEST BUY is reporting, the issue is what, eg HTC is reporting. Are HTC reporting SALES figures or SHIPPING figures?
And if they report shipping figures, it is the job of a journalist to give an appropriately skeptical and sarcastic description of the lack of value of those numbers. If journalists can't even do that much, why not call themselves Press Release Regurgitators, and stop wasting our time?

FWIW, Apple's quarterly reports state how many of each device were SOLD, not SHIPPED. You can go look at them if you don't believe me.


RE: Shipments
By Solandri on 8/18/2011 11:55:14 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yeah, I'm sure that will happen to all those unsold TouchPads --- they'll hang around at Best Buy for the next four years until they are all sold.

The retailers either cut the price until they sell. Or if their purchase agreement with the manufacturer allows, they send the units back for a refund. Those units get subtracted from the units shipped figures.

quote:
As for "Retailers are pretty reluctant to give out actual sales figures", no-one is asking Best Buy to give us a store by store breakdown of what is selling. What is being asked is that journalists not be gullible fools. The issue is not what BEST BUY is reporting, the issue is what, eg HTC is reporting. Are HTC reporting SALES figures or SHIPPING figures?

And I am telling you - HTC does not have sales figures because the retailers frequently don't tell them. All they know is the retailers asked for x00,000 of a product last quarter, and that's how many they shipped to them.

quote:
FWIW, Apple's quarterly reports state how many of each device were SOLD, not SHIPPED. You can go look at them if you don't believe me.

That's because a large portion of Apple's sales are direct sales, through their retail stores and educational programs. As sole supplier, they probably have some negotiating leverage to get the actual sales figures from the retailers they work with too.

It is not the norm for the industry though. Even the consolidated units shipped figures are typically in reports for which media companies have to pay thousands of dollars to access and get permission to republish. How do you think companies like Gartner make money to pay people to do this sort of research?


"Spreading the rumors, it's very easy because the people who write about Apple want that story, and you can claim its credible because you spoke to someone at Apple." -- Investment guru Jim Cramer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki