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Print 20 comment(s) - last by defiance74.. on Apr 19 at 2:05 AM

What good is a high-definition picture without the high-definition sound?

Pioneer Electronics will be offering a specially designed audio solution for owners of Microsoft's latest console gaming system.

Pioneer's HTP-XGS1 is a 5.1 channel surround sound system custom designed for the XBOX 360 console. It has a total power output of 600W through 5 satellite speakers: front left/right, center, and rear left/right, plus a subwoofer for bass. The system has 2 optical inputs, 1 coaxial, an analog input for audio and an AM/FM tuner.

The system features internal calibration to perfect the sound output in any setting and has a separate display to show information about what the use is controlling. The entire system is controlled by a remote which also works with the gaming console and is designed to match the look of the XBOX 360 console.

Pricing on the HTP-XGS1 is expected to be set at around $500 this coming June. Pioneer has always been a key player in the home theater market namely with its Elite brand of audio/video equipment. Owners of the XBOX 360 console should be tempted at a fairly priced, if not affordable, high powered audio system such as Pioneer's offering.


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RE: Great...
By Lifted on 5/10/2006 8:20:23 PM , Rating: 1
Uhhhhhhhhhhhhh, sure.

Since when did it become acceptable to use 'higher end' and 'Pioneer' in the same sentence?


RE: Great...
By Lakku on 5/10/2006 8:26:18 PM , Rating: 3
And when has it not been? Don't pretend to be elitist and compare a sub 2k dollar reciever to something exotic or special interest. But when a sub-2k dollar reciever gets higher makrs then most anything in its class and is compared to other receivers costing twice as much, then yeah, it can be considered 'higher end'.


RE: Great...
By brystmar on 5/11/2006 1:15:18 AM , Rating: 3
what "marks" are you talking about? and by whom was this "rating" given? Consumer Reports?! (who, btw, have NO idea what they're talking about when it comes to audio products.)

if there's one thing i've learned from my 8 years of experience in the audio/video world it's that you simply CANNOT compare speakers or electronics on paper. a $500 Sony receiver boasting "100 watts per channel" doesn't have nearly as much actual power output as a something like the $500 Harman/Kardon AVR-240, which claims a conservative 50 watts of power output per channel with all channels driven and 65 wpc with only two channels driven.

if you know anything about either audio or about physics, you know that producing load on an amplifier reduces its power output. you would also know that its power output differs as the impedance and frequency of the signal vary. so, when you see a rating like H/K's that details its power output thusly: "65 watts x 2 channels or 50 watts x 7 channels (into 8 ohms, 20Hz – 20kHz, 0.07% THD)" -- you know alot more about the amp's capabilities than simply saying "50 watts x 7 channels." the average consumer doesn't know this though; they just think, "the Sony has 100 watts and the H/K only has 50 watts, so the Sony must be better!" so please take power ratings with a rather large grain of salt unless they are detailed (as above) or are from a reputable manufacturer, like some of the brands mentioned below.

that said, i hardly consider Pioneer to be a decent brand for electronics (minus their TVs and the Pioneer Elite line). virtually every receiver from every "major" brand like Sony, Pioneer, JVC, Kenwood, etc which sells for under about $700 is constructed **very** cheaply, especially in the amplifier section. i know this because i've serviced plenty of them and have taken more of them apart than probably any of you reading this.

the simple fact is that if you want good electronics, you should only be buying from companies that specialize in making good quality equipment like Marantz, Denon, Integra, Rotel, and Outlaw Audio. the only two "major" brands that make really solid stuff are Onkyo and Harman/Kardon; Yamaha is decent as well. i'm sorry to say that in my experience, the rest of it is pretty much junk. the good news is that you can get equipment from these companies for about the same price as you're willing to pay for a Sony or a Pioneer -- but the quality of each product will be *considerably* higher.

it's similar with speakers: you should buy from companies like Paradigm, B&W, Axiom, Klipsch, PSB, or even Polk that focus exclusively on making speakers. you'll get a much better product for about the same amount of $!

oh and just so you know, practically every audio component that gets even a halfway decent review will "easily compete with gear at over twice its price." believe me when i tell you that there's TONS of rhetoric like this used all over the audiophile world and that you should, again, take stuff like this with a grain of salt.


RE: Great...
By mxzrider2 on 5/11/2006 3:56:22 AM , Rating: 2
consumer reports doesnt know anything about anything, it is the most retard mag ever


RE: Great...
By kkwst2 on 5/10/2006 11:37:12 PM , Rating: 3
Uhhhhhhh...probably since 1962.

Uhhhhhhh...bonehead.


RE: Great...
By Cunthor01 on 5/11/2006 3:19:42 AM , Rating: 2
That was stupid to say. But then again, you probably have a Bose setup and agree with the salesman that told you how good it sounds.

And I agree with the person that said dont knock it till you try it. I would like to see how it compares to Logitech's higher offerings, since they seem to have the best 5.1 game setups.


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