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Tesla Model S
Beta models will be used for testing and for marketing

The Tesla Model S is the next EV that will hit the streets from Tesla. Tesla made its name with the $100,000 Tesla roadster that had an electric driving range of about 200 miles. The problem was that the Roadster cost so much and only held two people making it impractical for the masses.

Tesla has now started the beta production of its new car, the Model S. Like the Roadster, the Model S is an all-electric car with no gasoline motor. The Model S is also a larger vehicle that will hold four adults inside and it is much cheaper than the Tesla Roadster. The Model S is still, however, far from what most would consider affordable  (base price $57,000). 

“We have started assembling the Beta vehicles,” Tesla Motors’ Model S Program Director Jerome Guillen said. ”While most Betas are intended for testing to prepare for production, a few are earmarked for visits to North American Tesla stores later this year.”

The first of the beta vehicles will be used for testing and for press drives.

The S is expected to have a driving range of about 300 miles. The car is about $20,000 more expensive than the Nissan Leaf. The Leaf is rated for 100 miles on a charge, but the real world driving range varies greatly from 80 miles to as low as 60 miles in some areas. The real world driving range of the Model S will likely be lower than the estimates of Tesla.

VentureBeat reports that Tesla is also working on an all-electric SUV called the Model X. It will run on the same powertrain as the Model S. There is no indication at this point when the model X will be seen.

“Alpha” versions of the Model S started rolling off the production line back in January.



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Inaccurate article
By corduroygt on 7/29/2011 3:24:28 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
The S is expected to have a driving range of about 300 miles. The car is about $20,000 more expensive than the Nissan Leaf.


The $20K more expensive model S does not have 300 mile range, it has only 160 mile range, which in the real world will be close to the Leaf's range.

To get 300 mile range, you need to spend 80K+




RE: Inaccurate article
By Jeffk464 on 7/30/2011 11:39:20 PM , Rating: 1
Still I don't know to many people that drive more than 160 miles in a typical work day. For most people this should handle the daily commute and errands no problem. I personally don't think anyone will be missing gasoline powered cars once electric cars take over, and for sure they will. You are basically talking the reliability of a ceiling fan here with almost no "regular" maintenance. If I remember right people who leased the GM impact didn't want to give them up, and that was a pretty primitive electric car.


RE: Inaccurate article
By Spuke on 7/31/2011 11:11:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Still I don't know to many people that drive more than 160 miles in a typical work day.
Because it's not actually 160 miles, it's 160 depending on usage. Which can be 60 miles to 160 miles or 30 miles or 200 miles. Ask Tesla owners about the variance in their range. Not to mention in states like CA, charging at home will drastically increase your rates regardless of time of day.


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

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