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SSD is for notebook and desktop users

SanDisk has unveiled a new SSD today called the Ultra that is now shipping to retailers.

The Ultra SSD is sized to work in a notebook or a desktop computer and is designed for a drop-in upgrade to a machine for users. The SSD reads up to 280MB/s sequentially and up to 270MB/s sequential writes are supported. 
The drive has a mean time between failure rating of up to a million hours.

"Replacing a computer's hard disk drive with the SanDisk Ultra SSD is more cost effective than buying a new PC," said Kent Perry, director, product marketing, SanDisk. "Our new SSD delivers greater speed and reliability than a hard disk drive at an affordable price."

The SSD is offered in three capacities with a 60GB for $129.99, 120GB for $219.99, and a 240GB for $449.99. All three capacities are available right now in the U.S. and can be purchased from Newegg and other retailers.



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RE: Cost
By bah12 on 7/26/2011 4:36:20 PM , Rating: 2
But his point was that we have moved up a generation. So just as DDR3 was more expensive than DDR2, this generations SSD should be more expensive that last gen.

However as others have stated it is not the same as DDR2 v DDR3 as NAND is all about die size. So the market actually behaves the opposite, the drives get cheaper to produce each generation NOT more expensive. Hence why the last gen SSD is not a bargin like DDR2 was when DDR3 came out.

I tend to hope that with higher demand this will change, but as the market is currently behaving, your cost/GB will usually be equal if not lower with the newer tech. Certainly strange for our industry.

Take a look at newegg and you will see the last intel x25 120G they had in stock was $230, compared to the 320 @ $220.

The other factor to consider is that once a new gen is released these companies just drop production on the old one. Unlike the DDR example there simply is no market that "requires" the old gen. Then new gen drives will work perfectly fine as a replacement. Therefore barring the small window of stock they really aren't sold at the same time, and it wouldn't make sense for Intel to make a lower margin drive since there is no market that requires them to do so (unlike a few hundred thousand DDR2 boards that won't run with DDR3).


RE: Cost
By Reclaimer77 on 7/26/2011 4:49:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
However as others have stated it is not the same as DDR2 v DDR3 as NAND is all about die size. So the market actually behaves the opposite, the drives get cheaper to produce each generation NOT more expensive. Hence why the last gen SSD is not a bargin like DDR2 was when DDR3 came out.


Well yes but that's because of market forces. As demand causes production to ramp up, your margins from each unit can be lower. The more mainstream and less niche SSD's become, the better for everyone because it lowers prices.

But yes, I completely agree that die size is a big factor. And that also my DDR comparison was a bit wonky and not direct enough.

Competition also plays a big part in lowering prices. There's still only a handful of companies making HDD's. There are dozens of companies releasing SSD's, some we've never heard of before.


RE: Cost
By bug77 on 7/27/2011 3:27:13 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well yes but that's because of market forces. As demand causes production to ramp up, your margins from each unit can be lower. The more mainstream and less niche SSD's become, the better for everyone because it lowers prices.


You do realize that Flash is everywhere. From phones, to digital cameras, thumb drives, photo frames, MP3 players, you name it. So I'd say the production is pretty ramped up by now. Don't expect cost savings in this area.


RE: Cost
By Kurz on 7/27/2011 10:11:35 AM , Rating: 2
They are all different designs, form factors, and performance. Class 10 Flash is much more expensive than Class 2 for the physical memory.

Though since most people get around just fine with class 2 so thats where the market is right now. If everyone were to decide that Class 2 flash isnt enough they'll all move up to class 10 they'll have to ramp up production of Class 10 and deminish class 2. Then it'll be class 2 that'll be more expensive than Class 10. We saw this happen with the Ram Market.


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