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  (Source: starthack.com)
Hackers say they "are not scared anymore"

Hacker groups LulzSec and Anonymous have made their point clear: they can infiltrate pretty much any government/corporate system they choose, and can cause plenty of chaos while doing so. In 2011 alone, Sony, Fox.com, PBS, NATO, Pron.com, the Arizona Police Department, the CIA, News Corp., Bank of America and many more were hacked by the two groups.

Just this week, the FBI arrested 16 alleged members who were associated with some of the cyber attacks. Fourteen were responsible for the attack against PayPal last December, while the fifteenth person was arrested on charges associated with the intrusion of computer systems at InfraGard and the sixteenth had allegedly downloaded thousands of documents related to AT&T's LTE broadband network and 4G data network. Those arrested ranged from ages 20 to 42, and were located in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Nevada, Washington D.C. and Ohio.

When these arrests were made, the FBI's Deputy Assistant Director Steven Chabinsky told NPR that this victory for the FBI sends "a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable." Hackers responded with the following message:

We are not scared any more. Your threats to arrest us are meaningless to us as you cannot arrest an idea. Any attempt to do so will make your citizens more angry until they will roar in one gigantic choir. It is our mission to help these people and there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- you can possibly do to make us stop.

The message didn't end there. Anonymous also added that governments and corporations are the real enemy, and even listed why.

Now let us be clear here, Mr. Chabinsky, while we understand that you and your colleagues may find breaking into websites unacceptable, let us tell you what WE find unacceptable:
    • Governments lying to their citizens and inducing fear and terror to keep them in control by dismantling their freedom piece by piece.
    • Corporations aiding and conspiring with said governments while taking advantage at the same time by collecting billions of funds for federal contracts we all know they can't fulfill.
    • Lobby conglomerates who only follow their agenda to push the profits higher, while at the same time being deeply involved in governments around the world with the only goal to infiltrate and corrupt them enough so the status quo will never change.
Chabinsky noted in the NPR interview that LulzSec and Anonymous' activities, no matter the reason, could put citizens in danger of terrorists or organized crime groups caught a glimpse of the government documents the hacker groups leak online.

"There has not been a large-scale trend toward using hacking to actually destroy websites, [but] that could be appealing to both criminals or terrorists," said Chabinsky. "That's where 'hacktivism,' even if currently viewed by some as a nuisance, shows the potential to be destabilizing."

LulzSec tweeted a similar message to Anonymous' on July 21, with a quirky twist:

"Arresting people won't stop us, FBI," said LulzSec's tweet. "We will only cease fire when you all wear shoes on your heads. That's the only way this is ending."


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RE: This will not end well...
By JediJeb on 7/22/2011 5:35:54 PM , Rating: 2
It is never right to do wrong to do right.

Instead of doing illegal hacking to gain attention to their cause, these "youth" could be putting their advanced skills to use developing informational websites and events to promote their cause, if they truly have a cause worth pursuing. If I want to point out the injustices of murder, I would be foolish to do it by stealing. If I wanted to point out the injustice of slavery, I would be foolish to use rape to do it. When you use terror or other illegal means to promote your cause, no matter how just it may be, you are defeating your purpose and turning away the very people you want to influence.

Some would point out something like the original Tea Party in the 1700's as using something illegal to get a point across. But if you study the details of that event you will find that all the tea dumped into the harbor was then paid for, as well as any damage that might have occurred because of it. Paid for by the very people who were involved that is. Also the group turned in one member who took some of the tea home with him for theft, so they were a very well self policing group also. A civil protest for a cause will always gain better support than a malicious one, especially if the malicious one endangers innocent bystanders.


RE: This will not end well...
By guffwd13 on 7/22/2011 5:48:14 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
these "youth" could be putting their advanced skills to use developing informational websites and events to promote their cause


And about 10 people would actually read it. In order to gain attention on the internet, you need to have significant shock value. Think wikileaks. Thats the last one I can think of that came out of no where and became popular enough to change how people thought. And wikileaks and Lulzsec are on completely two different playing fields. One did at out of spite for fame and money, the other seems to actually have a cause and are playing their cards far more responsibly.

And the entire revolution, by definition was illegal. Lexington and Concord was illegal. Thomas Paine was illegal. Every shot fired during the revolution was illegal. It was made legal when we won because we got to write the history books.

Point and change is not made by those who play the rules. Those who do are only good at perpetuating the norm. People will get hurt. Its war.

We'll see who wins.


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