backtop


Print 72 comment(s) - last by The0ne.. on Jul 6 at 2:11 PM


Apple is rumored to be packing 19 nm, 400 MBps, ONFI 3.0 compliant flash memory onto the motherboard of the new MacBook Air.  (Source: 9 to 5 Mac)
Integrating chips into the motherboard could allow the MacBook Air to offer high performance affordably

With a refresh of the MacBook Air seemingly impending the rumor mill surrounding Apple Inc. (AAPL) is once again heating up.  

According to Macotakara.jp, a Japanese Apple fan site, the latest version of the ultraportable will use cutting edge flash memory technology.  The site cites sources at unnamed Asian chipmakers as claiming that the latest Airs will contain 19nm flash memory chips soldered directly onto the motherboard for blazing speeds of up to 400 megabits per second.

Current generation MacBook Airs only have RAM chips soldered on.  The SSD for the laptops are connected using mSATA connectors.

Apple reportedly calls the new technology Toggle DDR2.0.  Aside from the rather curious title (ostensibly it involves NAND flash, not DDR memory), the technology is expected to be Apple's proprietary implementation of the Open NAND Flash Interface (ONFI) Working Group's ONFI 3.0 standard.

ONFI 3.0 promises faster speeds and reduces the number of pins on flash memory chips.  These factors add up to nearly "instant" boot times and fast file copies.

If the rumor about the new flash is true, it likely comes from Micron Technology, Inc. (MU), Intel Corp. (INTC), or Spansion Inc. (CODE) -- all members of the ONFI 3.0 coalition.  Apple's current NAND supplier, South Korea's Samsung Electronics (SEO:005930), and the world's second biggest producer, Toshiba Corp. (TYO:6502) are not currently members.

A split with Samsung would make sense, given Apple's ongoing legal war with the gadget and component maker.

At times Apple has been on the bleeding edge of introducing new standards.  It was the first major manufacturer to push Intel's proprietary LightPeak interface, which it renamed Thunderbolt.  The refresh of the MacBook Air is expected to come packing Thunderbolt as well, which requires fancy chip-laden $50 USD cables to work.

OS X Lion and the refreshed MacBook Air are expected to launch on July 14.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: new standards?
By 8steve8 on 7/5/2011 6:41:16 PM , Rating: 2
agreed.

and even if Light Peak cables eventually become passive (not sure what their plan is... but still...), it'll be the firewire of the last generation of interconnects.

usb2 won because it was built into all chipsets.
usb3 will be built into all chipsets next year, light peak will not. It will require extra chips/money/space/energy on top of the chipset. This is why it will be a niche product.

That said, niche products can still be awesome, but I'm not sure why apple is pushing it, who benefits? i suppose its nice to use one port for display and possible expansion out of a macbook air, as apposed to a separate minidisplayport and esata port... still...

next year when ivy bridge chipsets have built in/free usb3, it'll be sad that the macbook air will require the extra space / chip/ energy to power a chip for the thunderbolt functionality in the minidisplayport.

seems like a real miscalculation on their part.


RE: new standards?
By 8steve8 on 7/5/2011 6:45:26 PM , Rating: 2
backwards compatibility also sealed the deal for usb2


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 6:53:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
it will be a niche product
Is this equal to Reclaimer's "lose and lose horribly" above? If yes then I agree with you.
quote:
why apple is pushing it, who benefits?
Apple customers of course, who else would that be?
quote:
it'll be sad that the macbook air will require the extra space / chip/ energy to power a chip for the thunderbolt functionality in the minidisplayport
Sad because of extra speed gained by using this power? Since when did gaining extra speed become "sad" huh?
quote:
seems like a real miscalculation on their part
Yeah, being too fast is miscalculation, better being slow eh? :)))


RE: new standards?
By 8steve8 on 7/5/2011 7:19:33 PM , Rating: 2
eh i don't believe many consumers would notice the difference between a device on a usb3 and a thunderbolt port.

could you give me an example?


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 7:33:24 PM , Rating: 2
SSD RAID


RE: new standards?
By 8steve8 on 7/5/2011 8:17:01 PM , Rating: 3
yeah definitely something the typical apple consumer will use on their laptops. //


RE: new standards?
By 8steve8 on 7/5/2011 8:20:07 PM , Rating: 2
- externally -

: )


RE: new standards?
By yomamafor1 on 7/5/2011 8:51:24 PM , Rating: 2
It really shows how he's in tune with actual Apple buyers... LOL


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 9:21:41 PM , Rating: 2
this is for typical Apple prosumer, these guys kill for speed


RE: new standards?
By seamonkey79 on 7/6/2011 12:39:04 AM , Rating: 3
Then why do they buy Apple? For the blazing last generation video, or the blazing 3rd and 4th tier CPUs? It must be for the blazing speed of the whites from the LCD that get to your eye faster than any other computer's whites...


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/6/2011 1:29:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
For the blazing last generation video
Macs are not the best gaming machines, so what?
quote:
blazing 3rd and 4th tier CPUs?
So Xeon E5620 is "3rd and 4th tier" CPU? I smell some envy here! Looks like you can't afford those, hence you call them "3rd and 4th tier", hahaha :)) I can see through ya! No need to try to BS me.
quote:
It must be for the blazing speed of the whites from the LCD
Don't envy the Thunderbolt bandwidth. You work some more hours and you could then afford at least one Thunderbolt cable. Maybe. Such is life, not everyone can get the fastest stuff. Deal with it.


RE: new standards?
By Bad-Karma on 7/6/2011 2:04:17 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Xeon E5620 is "3rd and 4th tier"


Itanium -Tukwila (soon to be eclipsed by Poulson)

E3-12xx-series "Sandy Bridge"

E7-x8xx-series "Westmere-EX"

6500/7500-series "Beckton"

3600/5600-series "Gulftown & Westmere"
X5698
X5690
X5680
X5677
X5675
X5670
X5660
X5650
L5640
L5638
E5640
E5630
E5620
L5630
L5609
W3670
W3680

C3500/C5500-series "Jasper Forest"

So your E5620 is actually at the lower third of the 5th tier (not counting Poulson). Sells on Newegg right now for $389, just $75 more than a I7-2600K. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N8... Which is 4 times cheaper than my last Raid card......


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/6/2011 3:05:50 AM , Rating: 2
Decomposing corpse of Itanic has no place here, and if seamonkey meant "3rd of 4th place in the global speed hierarchy of all CPUs out there" then yeah, I kinda agree with that. I know Macs don't have the fastest CPUs on Earth right now. Just wasn't sure about what seamonkey meant exactly.


RE: new standards?
By yomamafor1 on 7/5/2011 9:10:28 PM , Rating: 2
You really have no clue do you?

First, let's talk about the technical side. Currently the Thunderbolt has the most bandwidth @ 10Gbit/s, or approximately 1250MB/s, while USB 3.0 maximum throughput is 5Gbit/s, or 625MB/s. So USB 3.0 has about half the bandwidth of Thunderbolt. We also know that Thunderbolt will be used to transmit large video/audio files to an external storage. However, the fastest 7200RPM HDD, what will most likely be used as the storage medium, is 100MB/s. Even the fastest 3TB drive at this time is 170MB/s, which only consumes less than 30% of the total bandwidth of USB 3.0, and less than 15% of the total bandwidth of Thunderbolt. So why should I go out and get a $50 cable, just have a bunch of unused bandwidth lying around, when I can get a $.50 USB cable that get the same performance?

Next, the practicality side. For desktop users, if they want to use SSD RAID, they put them in the case via SATA, not externally. For laptop users, they won't use an external SSD to RAID with the internal drive because the moment you break the RAID, you have to rebuild it. You can RAID two SSDs externally, but what's the point of RAIDing two SSDs for performance, just to use as a mass storage device? So both of your scenarios make absolutely no sense at all.


RE: new standards?
By ph0tek on 7/5/2011 9:24:06 PM , Rating: 2
Theres very little use for LighrPeak on Apples laptops, it was a stupid decision considering the type of people (idiots) that buy them. But it has many other uses for professional video editors for example, many do not use HDD's, they're not fast enough. And Sony's new Z laptops use LightPeak (and they call it LightPeak too, not Thunderbolt) to power an external GPU. USB3 has nowhere near the bandwidth for that. LightPeak is basically PCIE in cable form and that has many uses, just not so much for average consumers yet.


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 9:41:57 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
it was a stupid decision considering the type of people (idiots) that buy them
So the guys who do professional HD NLE on these laptops are idiots? More likely the idiot is you then. Much more likely.


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 9:38:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You can RAID two SSDs externally, but what's the point of RAIDing two SSDs for performance, just to use as a mass storage device? So both of your scenarios make absolutely no sense at all.
Learn what the HD NLE is son :))) You just have no idea about some very interesting things that exist outside your little box.


RE: new standards?
By ph0tek on 7/5/2011 9:14:07 PM , Rating: 2
You can connect external GPU's with LightPeak (i'm never calling it thunderbolt). As with Sony's new laptops. I dont think USB3 and LightPeak are meant to compete. Light Peak is considerably superior though and will last a lot longer. Already USB3 barely cuts it for SSD's.


RE: new standards?
By yomamafor1 on 7/5/2011 9:17:51 PM , Rating: 2
Barely?

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4256/the-ocz-vertex-...

Assuming best case scenario for sequential write, OCZ Vertex 3 can hit 370MB/s.

The maximum bandwidth for USB 3.0 is 625MB/s. Barely indeed.


RE: new standards?
By Pirks on 7/5/2011 9:33:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
OCZ Vertex 3 can hit 370MB/s
Four of these in RAID 0 will pwn ya puny little USB like there's no tomorrow :))) Are you even serious? I see you just have no idea about what SSD RAID is. Go do some basic reading about SSD RAIDs before replying please

P.S. Your babbling about HDD RAID is pretty funny too. Babble all ya want, I said NOTHING about HDDs, so I don't care what ya babble about 'em.


"So if you want to save the planet, feel free to drive your Hummer. Just avoid the drive thru line at McDonalds." -- Michael Asher














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki