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Haswell CPUs will contain vector processors and a more power on-die GPU. The chips are designed to power the next generation of "Ultrabooks".  (Source: ASUSTek)

An Intel corporate blog post seemed to confirm both the presence of vector coprocessor silicon and a 2013 release date for the 22 nm Haswell.  (Source: Intel)
Company looks to new 22 nm architecture to hold off AMD and ARM Holdings

Intel Corp. (INTC) has dropped a few hints to its upcoming 22 nm Haswell architecture, currently under development by the company's secret Oregon team.  In a post on the Intel Software Network blog titled "Haswell New Instruction Descriptions Now Available!", the company reveals that it plans to launch the new CPU in 2013.

Haswell will utilize the same power-saving tri-gate 3D transistor technology that will first drop with Ivy Bridge in early 2012.  Major changes architecturally reportedly include a totally redesigned cache, fused multiply add (FMA3) instruction support, and an on-chip vector coprocessor.

The vector process, which will work with the on-die GPU, was a major focus of the post.  The company is preparing a series of commands called Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX), which will speed up vector math.  It writes:

Intel AVX addresses the continued need for vector floating-point performance in mainstream scientific and engineering numerical applications, visual processing, recognition, data-mining/synthesis, gaming, physics, cryptography and other areas of applications. Intel AVX is designed to facilitate efficient implementation by wide spectrum of software architectures of varying degrees of thread parallelism, and data vector lengths.

According to CNET, Intel's marketing chief Tom Kilroy indicates that Intel hopes for the new chip's integrated graphics to rival today's discrete graphics.  

Intel has a ways to go to meet that objective -- its on-die GPU in Sandy Bridge marked a significant improvement over past designs (which were housed in a separate package, traditionally), however it also fell far short of the GPU found in Advance Micro Devices (AMD) Llano Fusion APUs.

Intel has enjoyed a love/hate relationship with graphics makers AMD and NVIDIA Corp. (NVDA).  While it's been forced to allow their GPUs to live on its motherboards and alongside its CPUs, the company has also fantasized of usurping the graphics veterans.  Those plans culminated in the company's Larrabee project, which aimed to offer discrete Intel graphics cards.

Now that a commercial release of Larrabee has been cancelled, Intel has seized upon on-die integrated graphics as its latest answer to try to push NVIDIA and AMD out of the market.  Intel is promoting heavily the concept of ultrabooks -- slender notebooks like the Apple, Inc.'s (AAPL) MacBook Air or ASUTEK Computer Inc.'s (TPE:2357) UX21, which feature low voltage CPUs and -- often -- no discrete GPU.

Mr. Kilroy reportedly wants ultrabook manufacturers using Haswell to shoot for target and MSRP of $599 USD, which would put them roughly in line with this year's Llano notebooks from AMD and partners.  It's about $100 USD less than current Sandy Bridge notebooks run.

Intel faces pressure from a surging ARM Holdings plc's (ARMH) who is looking to unveil notebook processors sometime next year.



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RE: Hah
By Breakfast Susej on 6/24/2011 1:05:49 PM , Rating: 1
Nvidia's CEO is a rampaging douchebag. However he does at least deserve credit for being right on the money when he referred to larrabee as laughabee.


RE: Hah
By Pessimism on 6/24/2011 1:49:34 PM , Rating: 2
His refusal to own up to bumpgate prompted me to permanently boycott all NVIDIA products. Shame too, because Tegra2 is spreading through smartphones and tablets like a virus.


RE: Hah
By Mitch101 on 6/24/2011 2:07:56 PM , Rating: 3
Im glad I missed bumpgate but my boycott comes from the NVIDIA hard drive fiasco that caused me to lose data. The solution I vaguely recall was to turn off some advanced hard drive option in the bios and use the Microsoft drivers. Both the NVIDIA drivers and the bios setting could cause data loss and I did. NVIDIA never owned up to the problem.

Its a shame I was a cheerleader for them back when the TNT came out but they are not the same company now.


RE: Hah
By MrTeal on 6/24/2011 2:16:36 PM , Rating: 2
I feel the same way about OCZ today. There has been open issues with the Vertex 2 series where they don't respond to commands and will BSOD after resuming from sleep. OCZ's recommendation for the last almost year has been "don't sleep your laptop, turn it off instead".


RE: Hah
By DanNeely on 6/24/2011 2:35:53 PM , Rating: 2
A recent article on Anandtech implies they're finally able to reproduce the problem. The issue went away when they hooked up any sort of debugging tools, making it a nightmare to diagnose. Hopefully this means they'll actually be able to fix it soon...


RE: Hah
By MrTeal on 6/24/2011 3:17:04 PM , Rating: 2
That's the Vertex 3 issues. The Vertex 2 issues don't seem to have an end in sight.


RE: Hah
By DanNeely on 6/24/2011 3:43:31 PM , Rating: 2
I thought it was the same issue for both generations of the SF controller.


RE: Hah
By MrTeal on 6/24/2011 4:11:44 PM , Rating: 3
I don't believe so. According to the last edit on the OCZ support thread on this topic, it's still an issue.

quote:
EDIT by RyderOCZ on March 30: DO NOT hibernate your SSD or use sleep. Shut the machine down when you are not using it. That is our best recommendation at this time. Hibernation and/or sleep may cause the drive to no longer be recognized when you wake it up.


RE: Hah
By Alexvrb on 6/25/2011 3:39:16 PM , Rating: 1
At some point I've been hit by Nvidia's Bumpgate, HDD controller issues (corruption), and their "hardware-based" firewall that never worked reliably. So while I won't bash their discrete graphics, I am leery of their chipsets and integrated graphics.


RE: Hah
By B-Unit on 6/27/2011 10:17:13 AM , Rating: 2
My boycott relates to the furious rebranding of the G92 generation of cards (8800GT -> 9800GT -> GTX(S?)250). I felt that it was inexcusable to simply rename the same card. Granted, most who would bother to buy a descrete GPU should have known, but for the average consumer, there was no way to know you were buying a 2 generation old product.


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