backtop


Print 64 comment(s) - last by Trisped.. on Jun 24 at 3:08 PM


MyFord Touch  (Source: egmcartech.com)
Ford and other automakers' newest technologies will be rated this Thursday when J.D. Power and Associates releases its annual initial-quality study, which is based on consumer opinions

When it comes to in-car communications and entertainment systems, it's no secret that MyFord Touch is the problematic one of the bunchConsumer Reports has said that the system is too complex and distracting due to its lack of tactile buttons and knobs as well as its voice recognition system. In addition, the fact that its screens are partially controlled by two steering-wheel-mounted five-way switches doesn't help its case either. 

Now, auto reviewers aren’t the only ones hating on MyFord Touch, and MyFord Touch isn't the only Ford technology being criticized. Consumers are now throwing in their two cents, and it's not looking favorable for some of Ford's newest technologies.

While not all consumers who have tested MyFord Touch dislike it, many have complained that the system reboots randomly and has trouble responding to voice commands. In addition, some of is features confuse consumers, even though Ford dealerships offer courses on how to use the system. The good news is that many revisions are in development and will be "phased in" over the next year. 

Aside from technical issues, safety advocates worry that the system will distract drivers too easily causing accidents. 

Others have also mentioned problems concerning Ford's PowerShift dual-clutch automatic transmission, which can be found on the 2011 Fiesta and the 2012 Focus. The PowerShift combines two manual transmissions where one clutch controls first, third and fifth gears while the second clutch controls second, fourth and sixth gears. The idea behind the system is to enable more efficient shifting in order to improve fuel economy. 

Despite its best intentions, the system isn't perfect. Consumers have noted that the system overall is "jerky" with unexpected shifts. Also, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration noted that "huge metallic noises" occurred when downshifting at low speeds, and "dangerous gear changes" made the vehicle surge and eventually stall. 

"The Focus is a little slow to find the right gear as you're slowing from 50 miles per hour," said David Champion, director of Consumer Reports' auto test center in East Haddam, Connecticut. 

But Ford spokesman Richard Truett assures that the PowerShift is just a "different type of transmission" that uses actuators and solenoids to change gears electronically, and that it just takes some getting used to. 

"Consumers will hear different sounds and experience different sensations," said Truett. "But that's normal. We chose the PowerShift because it helps deliver outstanding performance and best-in-class 40 miles per gallon fuel economy." 

Ford and other automakers' newest technologies will be rated this Thursday when J.D. Power and Associates releases its annual initial-quality study. The study is based on consumer judgment after 90 days of ownership, and consumers are to point out any problems they encounter.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By wolrah on 6/21/2011 12:25:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why would anyone ever buy an automatic tranmission unless they had some form of disability?


Because it's faster? Perfect shifts in either direction, performed faster than any human ever with a standard.

When well implemented (as apparently the Ford was NOT, but let's use a VW GTI as an example) the only objective downsides to a DCT are cost and complexity.

Now, subjectively I won't deny that it's just enjoyable to row your own gears, but look at any example ever of a vehicle offered with both DCT and standard, DCT is faster.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:32:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When well implemented (as apparently the Ford was NOT, but let's use a VW GTI as an example) the only objective downsides to a DCT are cost and complexity.
Depends on what you consider implemented correctly. VW (and pretty much everyone else) utilizes a wet clutch system while Ford utilizes a dry clutch system.

Its not suppose to perform on par with a wet clutching system, it is suppose to bring a DCT in price to the levels where it can be used in small and midsized vehicles. Unlike the expensive wet clutch systems that are usually used in torque heavy situations.

They are also usually less complex than wet clutch systems and do not require special transmission lubricants and higher priced synthetic oil to keep them running.

That said, this also kind of ruins your rule of always being faster ;) With a professional driver the 5 speed manual Focus goes from 0-60 in around 7.6, while the 6 speed auto DCT tuned in over 8. Great performance compared to a conventional automatic, but still not yet on par with a manual.

If you were to compare an 8 speed BMW DCT to a manual on the same vehicle, you would probably be correct ;)


By Johnmcl7 on 6/21/2011 8:47:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Depends on what you consider implemented correctly. VW (and pretty much everyone else) utilizes a wet clutch system while Ford utilizes a dry clutch system.


VW use both, the six speed DSG uses wet clutches but the seven-speed uses dry clutches.

John


"It's okay. The scenarios aren't that clear. But it's good looking. [Steve Jobs] does good design, and [the iPad] is absolutely a good example of that." -- Bill Gates on the Apple iPad














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki