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Reggie Fils-Aime doesn't see a problem with it, insisting that Wii U games will look similar when it launches

Yesterday proved to be an exciting time for Nintendo as it announced the Wii's successor, Wii U, at its press conference at E3. While the improved system specs and tablet-like controller seemed to have won many Nintendo fans over, the game footage looked like nothing the video game company has ever made before, and that's because it wasn't Nintendo footage at all

Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, admitted that some game footage at Nintendo's E3 press conference was taken from Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 games. 

Why did Nintendo think this would be appropriate, you ask? Fils-Aime insists that Wii U games will be "comparable" to the graphics and game play of Xbox 360 and PS3 games once it releases. 

"We're talking a year away from when the system's going to launch," said Fils-Aime. "The system's going to be 1080p. You're going to see games that take full advantage of a system that has the latest technology and can push out some incredible graphics."

The game footage shown at Nintendo's press conference was from Xbox 360 and PS3 games like "Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Online," "Madden Football" and "Assassin's Creed 2."

Nintendo Wii, Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Sony's PlayStation 3 are all part of the seventh generation of video game consoles. The Xbox 360 launched in 2005 while the Wii and PS3 were later released in 2006. Competition amongst the three consoles is pretty stiff as new game, hardware, and online networks are introduced in order to offer a better gaming experience. 

Sony and Microsoft's recent E3 briefings have brought news on a new portable PlayStation Vita, and Kinect-compatible games as well as voice recognition features. But out of the three competitors, Nintendo is the only one releasing a brand-new home console. 

Wii U will feature 1080p high-definition graphics over HDMI, an IBM Power-based multi-core processor, four USB 2.0 ports, and a built-in Secure Digital slot. The controller will feature an integrated 6.2" color LCD screen, two analog pads, a cross control pad, L/R buttons, A/B/X/Y buttons and ZL/ZR buttons. It will initially be featured in white, and will be released in 2012.



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RE: Nintendo
By boobo on 6/8/2011 7:00:55 PM , Rating: 1
Except that, when a new console is launched, it is usually faster than the fastest (single-GPU) PCs. The launch titles are supposed to look better than any game we have seen before. Then, after a year the PC catches up and then starts to surpass them.

The minimum specs of current games is not good enough because we have been taught to expect better.

If the console is launched and it is already 2 generations behind the current PCs, I just hope they planned for it to have a short life cycle. Otherwise, those will remain the minimum specs of most games for a long time.


RE: Nintendo
By Spivonious on 6/9/2011 10:25:09 PM , Rating: 2
That's never happened. What world are you living in?


RE: Nintendo
By Omega215D on 6/10/2011 2:49:47 AM , Rating: 2
It's the other way around. PC titles are not far beyond consoles, graphically, is due to making them playable to the almost lowest common denominator. Add to the fact that many games are also console ports that are not fully optimized for even the mid range of PCs. If there was a game that stressed the PCs to the extreme there would be outrage among the idiots who refuse to do even the modest of upgrades to play it. Crysis is actually a pretty good example, though the minimum requirements are usually best at VGA resolution for a game like that.

In other words, get your head out of you rear.


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