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Ford Fiesta
Ford continues to milk the benefits of turbocharging

The automotive industry is quickly embracing turbocharging technology for gasoline engines which was once relegated to sports cars and luxury vehicles in an effort to improve fuel efficiency. Now vehicles ranging from "lowly" Chevrolet Cruze compact sedans to Ford F-150s (as witnessed by our article earlier today) are jumping on the bandwagon. 

A little over a year ago, Ford debuted its Start concept car which featured a brand new three-cylinder EcoBoost engine. While the vehicle is (and likely will remain) a concept, the engine has now been approved for production

The tiny 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine is turbocharged (obviously) and features an offset crankshaft to help improve fuel economy. It also features a split cooling system to warm up the cylinder block before the cylinder heads. In addition, other EcoBoost staples like direct injection and twin independent variable camshaft timing are included. The engine also weighs less than the current 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine used in the Fiesta

All of this technology means that the tiny 1.0-liter engine puts out the same or better power as a normally aspirated 1.6-liter engine while achieving “much higher fuel economy and lower emissions”. 

“No one’s ever built a three-cylinder engine quite like this," said Joe Bakaj, Ford VP of Global Powertrain Engineering

“Consumers are telling us they want to buy affordable vehicles that get many more miles per gallon,” said Kuzak. “Our new 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine will give consumers looking for hybrid-like fuel economy a new, more affordable choice.” 

Ford isn't ready to provide EPA numbers for the 1.0-liter EcoBoost just yet, but the company said that it will get much better fuel economy than the already good 30 mpg city/40 mpg highway rating of the Fiesta with the 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine.



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RE: Nice idea
By RadnorHarkonnen on 6/2/2011 10:07:52 PM , Rating: 2
In Europe there are Turbo charged cars since the early 80s. Nowadays every car sold in Europe, whether is Diesel or Gasoline, has a form or Variant of a Turbo. My old Lancia Delta from 86 has 150HP with 1.6L Engine.

Ford is just selling there, whats being sold here for years now.

BTW, taking care of a Turbo is easy. Just start your car and wait a minute with the car running for the Turbo to warm up. Same when you shut it down, just wait a minute (stopped) with the car running so the turbo cools off. My Lancia has the same Turbo since 1986. No Problems what so ever.


RE: Nice idea
By knutjb on 6/3/2011 9:42:39 AM , Rating: 2
After the rise in fuel costs from the Carter period Ford sold turbo'd Thunderbirds in the early 80s. Ford does have a long history with turbos. Maybe not as long as GM from the early 60s or Porsche and the diesel industry. Fords modular motors applied vibration ideas learned from their early turbo experience, i.e. accessory brackets cast as part of the block. This isn't new to them.

What makes turbos so much easier now is the amazing oil quality compared to a decade ago, the materials, manufacturing tolerances, and CAD.


RE: Nice idea
By Johnmcl7 on 6/4/2011 6:07:02 AM , Rating: 2
I'm glad someone pointed this out, the article is somewhat inaccurate as turbocharging small engines may be new to the US market but it's old news here. The old Smart cars used small 650cc turbocharged engines years ago and there's plenty of manufacturers also using small turbocharged engines. VW have also mixed super and turbocharging on the same engine for the Golf sized cars and more recently the hot hatches.

John


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