backtop


Print 35 comment(s) - last by EricMartello.. on May 23 at 12:55 AM

Internet trends report predicts that real-time entertainment applications will account for 55 to 60 percent of peak aggregate traffic by the end of this year

A study of internet trends conducted by Sandvine has revealed that North American web users have become increasingly interested in on-demand applications like Netflix, and this enthusiasm for real-time entertainment categories will likely continue to grow.

Sandvine is a provider of intelligent broadband network solutions for fixed and mobile operators. It releases a Global Internet Phenomena Report annually, and has done so since 2002. These reports analyze internet phenomena and traffic on the web in North America, Latin America and Europe. 

In the Global Internet Phenomena Report: Spring 2011, Sandvine found that Netflix is now 29.7 percent of peak downstream traffic in North America, and has become "the largest source of internet traffic overall."

In 2009, real-time entertainment applications consumed 29.5 percent of peak aggregate traffic, and today, that number has increased to 49.2 percent. According to Sandvine's predictions, this category will account for 55 to 60 percent of peak aggregate traffic by the end of this year.

In Europe, real-time entertainment has steadily increased to 33.2 percent of peak aggregate traffic from 31.9 percent in fall 2010, and BitTorrent (peer-to-peer file sharing protocol) is the largest source of upstream internet traffic at 59.7 percent and also downstream internet traffic at 21.6 percent. The study reported that European subscribers consume twice the amount of data as North Americans.

In Latin America, real-time entertainment accounts for 27.5 percent of peak aggregate traffic. The report also found that social networking accounts for 14 percent of network traffic, which is more traffic than YouTube

"The information and trends in Sandvine's Spring 2011 Global Internet Phenomena Report emphasize the need for innovative solutions to keep up with rapidly evolving consumer demands for content and connectivity," said Dave Caputo, President and CEO of Sandvine. "The dramatic growth of Netflix and its impending global expansion are prime examples of a growing appetite for real-time entertainment. It is also important for fixed and mobile broadband providers to have real-time policy control capability, made possible by insightful business intelligence, in order to put sound strategic decisions into action."

The Spring 2011 Global Internet Phenomena Report is based on anonymous and voluntary data collected from mobile and fixed service provider networks in North America, Europe and Latin America, and over 220 service provider customers in over 85 countries.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Disingenuous
By Motoman on 5/18/2011 11:41:49 AM , Rating: 2
The problem there being that the consumers have no case, since all ISPs sell their services as "up to Xmb" without any guarantee of any minimum bandwidth level at all.

That will never change without industry regulation. The only rational solution is to require all ISPs to sell their services with a guaranteed MINIMUM bandwidth. That would be something that could be monitored and verified.

...some people say selling at an "average" would be fine, but that opens up a different can of worms. An average over time still allows your internet connection to be unusably slow at peak times.


RE: Disingenuous
By Akrovah on 5/18/2011 11:49:30 AM , Rating: 2
You can't guarentee a minimum bandwidth either though. Every ISP has periods of service interruption. Obviously you are not getting your minimum bandwidth at that point in time, and then the ISP still gets sued.


RE: Disingenuous
By Motoman on 5/18/2011 11:56:50 AM , Rating: 2
One can imagine that appropriate provisions could be given for things that the ISP can't reasonably be expected to control...like power outages or some idiot cutting their line with a shovel.

It's just like getting paid-for TV, either by cable or satellite...you buy a contract that says you get 100 channels. If a storm or whatever prevents you from getting your 100 channels for some period of time, that's the way it goes...people don't sue DirecTV for the 8 hours a month when they didn't get any service because of something DirecTV couldn't have managed.


RE: Disingenuous
By SunTzu on 5/22/2011 2:13:46 PM , Rating: 2
That's wierd, cus ive got a guaranteed 50/10 with my connection, up to 100/10, with a federal mandate that it has to be at 100/10 for x (i dont know how often its allowed to drop) hours of the day. I live in Sweden, and our ISPs have no problems with this. The only connections that arent forced to follow this are 3g mobile connections, for technical reasons.


RE: Disingenuous
By EricMartello on 5/23/2011 12:55:05 AM , Rating: 2
It's called and SLA, brah...get one if you need it.


RE: Disingenuous
By YashBudini on 5/20/2011 12:33:44 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
"up to Xmb"

And I could live with that if it wasn't pure fiction. TW used to advertise here "up to 5", we never saw more than 2. When they claimed "up to 10" we never saw over 3, and I mean NEVER, at any hour.

And Turbo is a joke, how long is its duration? 50 milliseconds?


"It seems as though my state-funded math degree has failed me. Let the lashings commence." -- DailyTech Editor-in-Chief Kristopher Kubicki














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki