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Print 31 comment(s) - last by Tony Swash.. on May 18 at 1:07 PM


  (Source: static.guim.co.uk)
The key to Apple's success is elimination

It's no secret that Apple is a wildly successful software/computing company. Its products compete with some of the largest tech giants in the world like Google and Microsoft, yet it beat them all when Millward Brown (and over 2 million consumers) selected Apple as the world's most valuable brand in the 2011 BrandZ study. 

For Apple, the strategy is quality over quantity. The company has a smaller portfolio than most tech companies, but that hasn't stopped it from being in the top ranks. Just last month, Apple announced record fiscal Q2 revenue of $24.67 billion USD

Apple has certainly come a long way after experiencing consecutive quarterly losses during its attempts at reinvention in the mid to late 1990's. But many credit Jobs' return to Apple in the late 90's for the company's turnaround and introduction of revolutionary products.

But according to Nike CEO Mark Parker, it isn't so much what Jobs did for the company that turned it into a success, but rather, it's what he didn't do. Parker recalls having a conversation with Jobs when he first returned to Apple as CEO, asking for advice regarding Parker's Nike products. 

"Do you have any advice?" Parker asked Jobs. 

"Well, just one thing," replied Jobs. "Nike makes some of the best products in the world. Products that you lust after. But you also make a lot of crap. Just get rid of the crappy stuff and focus on the good stuff." 

An awkward moment slipped by where Parker just laughed at the advice, but Jobs didn't even chuckle. He was serious about what he had said, and after thinking about it a moment, Parker realized he was right.

"We had to edit," said Parker.

When Jobs returned to Apple, he cut the product line down from 350 to 10, and focused only on a few machines that were meticulously perfected. This strict focus has led to effective product designs and communications for Apple. For instance, when Apple released the next-generation MacBook laptops, the company announced that its aluminum unibody enclosure reduced 60 percent of the machine's major structural parts, making it thinner, lighter and surprisingly stronger.  

"People think focus means saying yes to the thing you've got to focus on," said Jobs. "But that's not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I'm actually as proud of the things we haven't done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying 'no' to 1,000 things."



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RE: Apple strategy
By kleinma on 5/17/2011 4:49:46 PM , Rating: 2
If you like being told what to buy, how you should use it, and have no deviation from the course that Steve has set out on, then Apple is for you. If you actually care about having a computer that you can make yours (and not his) then something along the PC lines is a better choice.


RE: Apple strategy
By Tony Swash on 5/17/11, Rating: -1
RE: Apple strategy
By perfixalot on 5/18/2011 6:01:13 AM , Rating: 2
McDonald's also makes a lot of burgers that millions want and buy. It must be great food then.

And it is great food, from a sales point of view, from a lot of people's personal view point it must also seem to great food, or they wouldn't keep buying it.

Even though many of us realize that fast-food is not really great value for money, nor nutritionally superior, we still eat the crap they make.

To me the question is more about is the trend in consumption of technology (as well as food) really beneficial to society, communities and even the world as whole?

I don't know the answer for sure, but I just have gut feeling that a lot of the global issues causing a lot of misery for the unfortunate is due to people wanting things to be easy. The simplest way to have things easy is to ignore the hard questions, assume it's up to others to provide you with solutions that "just work", and build an identity by proxy by associating yourself with hyped labels, such as "quality", "successful", "innovative", etc.


RE: Apple strategy
By Tony Swash on 5/18/2011 1:07:04 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
I don't know the answer for sure, but I just have gut feeling that a lot of the global issues causing a lot of misery for the unfortunate is due to people wanting things to be easy. The simplest way to have things easy is to ignore the hard questions, assume it's up to others to provide you with solutions that "just work", and build an identity by proxy by associating yourself with hyped labels, such as "quality", "successful", "innovative", etc.


That makes a lot of sense.

Why make complex technology easy? Why empower more people to use it? Let's make it harder because thats better (for some reason), lets make all keyboards with braille, lets make all the menu items in Sanskrit, lets shrink the size and definition of displays so they are harder to see, lets make the OS really obscure, non-intuitive and buggy (I guess Microsoft has that one covered already).

People really do the talk the most amazing bollocks on this forum especially when they are deranged by Apple-phobia.


RE: Apple strategy
By optics261 on 5/18/2011 7:57:30 AM , Rating: 1
People have been customizing Mac's and making them their own for a long time.


"So if you want to save the planet, feel free to drive your Hummer. Just avoid the drive thru line at McDonalds." -- Michael Asher














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