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More customers are trading their PS3's for Xbox 360's

A little over a month ago, Sony was sitting in a good position with over 50 million PlayStation 3 units sold worldwide. But after the recent security breach, customers are getting fed up and even began trading their PS3's for Xbox 360's. 

The PlayStation 3 is Sony's third home video game console in the PlayStation series, and was released in 2006. One of its most notable features is its online gaming service called the PlayStation Network (PSN), which offers online multiplayer gaming and digital media delivery. But on April 20 of this year, the network went down after millions of users' personal information and even credit card numbers were stolen in a massive security breach. Sony didn't announce what had happened until April 26. 

Now, retail numbers are beginning to show the customer's frustrations. According to different video game retailers around the world, gamers have been trading their PS3's for Xbox 360's at an increasing rate, and have even switched pre-orders of certain game titles from PS3 to Xbox 360.

"In the first week of downtime we did not really see any major change in sales or trades," said an anonymous UK retailer. "However, from the second week onwards we have seen an increase of over 200 percent on PS3 consoles being traded in, split almost 50/50 between those trading for cash and those taking a 360 instead."

According to UK retailers, the week ending March 16 showed that 49 percent of users bought "Call of Duty: Black Ops" for Xbox 360 while only 37 percent bought the PS3 version. At the end of the following week, 52 percent of bought the PS3 version while only 40 percent bought the Xbox 360 version.

But after April 20, these numbers began changing. In the week ending April 30, 59 percent of "Black Ops" sales went to the Xbox 360 while 30 percent went to the PS3. Last week, 66 percent of users bought the Xbox 360 title while 24 percent bought the PS3 title. 

In addition to "Call of Duty: Black Ops," another popular game, "FIFA 11," saw a decline in PS3 versions. In the week ending April 16, Xbox 360 had 49 percent of the sales while PS3 had 37 percent, and the week after, Xbox 360 stayed at the top with 46 percent and PS# at 34 percent. The numbers became more obvious in the week ending April 30 with Xbox 360 at 52 percent and PS# at 26 percent, and last week with Xbox 360 at 49 percent and PS3 at 21 percent. 

"At the end of each month, people come to sell their consoles," said Tom Mestdagh, from Belgian indie Gameswap. "People that need money [to pay bills]. What's different this time around is that they are bringing in PS3's together with all their games and they don't want money, they want an Xbox 360. In every case it is because of 'Black Ops' and/or 'Modern Warfare 2.' We're just ten days into the month and already we have an increase of 200 percent in PS3's coming into the store compared to all of March. Normally we sell them really fast, but not this time. We've only sold 30 to 40 percent of our inventory right now."

Reports also noted that PSN customers are upset with how Sony has handled this issue, and they've even stopped complaining about the charges for Xbox Live. Customer satisfaction is undoubtedly at a low, and Sony's problems only seem to be getting worse.


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RE: Fair-weather gamers
By PLD_Xavier on 5/13/2011 1:51:12 PM , Rating: 0
First of all: known vulnerabilities are those known by the company or organization, regardless of whether or not they publicly released information revealing it. Almost certainly will a company hide their knowledge of a problem until it has been fixed or exploited in the hopes that it won't be noticed (remember the problem with DNS a few years back?). Microsoft -- like many companies including Sony, Apple, and Google -- always releases incomplete software (the definition of "complete software" itself is a book's worth of discussion) with the plan to fix it with future patches. Those 100+ patches don't represent every problem they know of, but are the first problems (after cost-benefit analysis) that they decided to fix. While they do release patches for their products (like the recent WINS patch), you can be sure that there are openings for exploiting that Microsoft knows about but hasn't acted to fix. Meanwhile, nobody holds them responsible when someone takes advantage of an internally-known security hole that they haven't cleaned up.

Secondly, I wouldn't want you to feel blindsided by such things. Therefore, let this be your warning: there is no such thing as internet privacy or safety. There never has been, and there never will be.

Anything is hackable and no data is ever secure. There are measures designed to make information and systems HARDER to hack/read/write/control, but they are not infallible. If you list your name, address, phone number, email address, pets names, etc on social networking sites or anywhere else on the internet (including your home computer), be aware that it WILL be read by someone you don't know and without your permission. If you don't want people to know your address, don't give it out. Don't shop online, because I can promise you that your shipping information has been passed around more than a dollar bill. For that matter, shred every piece of mail that arrives on your doorstep on the offchance that someone's rooting through garbage to pick up people's names and addresses. Email servers are also not secure, so any emails you might have written are free for the taking. It's why companies encrypt hard drives and emails (which, while safer than doing nothing, is not completely safe).

This is the same hoopla that has happened and will (unfortunately) continue to happen when people are surprised that someone could find out what they did on the internet. The closest you'll get to a safe network is one that is closed off from the internet and other networks, but that's not going to do you much good for online gaming.


“Then they pop up and say ‘Hello, surprise! Give us your money or we will shut you down!' Screw them. Seriously, screw them. You can quote me on that.” -- Newegg Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng referencing patent trolls














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