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The successor to Windows 7 may soon greet the masses

One of the major keys to Windows 7's great success and massive rebound from the disappointment of Vista was the incredibly popular public beta test program that launched at the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2009.  Two years later Microsoft is well on the way to releasing the successor to the popular Windows 7, Windows 8, and it's reportedly preparing for a new beta program.

Softpedia reported last week that it received "Windows 8 Build 6.2.7959.0 Milestone 3 (M3)", an important preliminary build.  Compiled March 7, 2011 (based on the name string of the full build of the release), if authentic the build indicates that Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) is closing in on Build 8000 -- typically the build at which it launches a beta.

According to CentrumXP, developers now have access to "Build 6.2.7996.0.winmain_win8m3.110429-181" in the winmain_win8m3 branch.  The number in its build string (110429) indicates a release date of April 29, 2011.

That means that by now the Build 8000 may be compiled and almost ready to go.  It still remains to be seen, though, if the rumors are true and this is a beta build.  

One thing that calls that theory into question is the rumor that Microsoft will be working on Milestone 3 from February to July.  A finished build in May is way ahead of that schedule and doesn't quite add up.

According to rumors and leaks, Microsoft will wrap up Milestone 3, move on to a single beta, and finally air a release candidate before a commercial launch in late 2012/early 2013.  

Microsoft appears to be transitioning to a slightly faster release cycle, similar to what Apple does with OS X.  Whether that shorter release cycle will be accompanied by lower upgrade pricing remains to be seen.

The company is expected to possibly release the beta code to the broader developer community (only select developers have the current Milestone builds), and possibly announce a public beta at the Professional Developers Conference 2011 (PDC 2011) September 13–16, 2011, in Anaheim, California.

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer bills Windows 8 as his company's "riskiest product".  A preview that leaked about a month back showed a GUI similar to Windows 7, but with Microsoft Office's Ribbon inserted in new locations like the Windows Explorer.  Builds have also been seen running on ARM CPUs, which look to begin displacing Intel Corp. (INTC) and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.'s (AMD) x86 designs in mobile computers and servers over the next several years.



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RE: Swim
By icanhascpu on 5/11/2011 8:48:43 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Builds have also been seen running on ARM CPUs, which look to begin displacing Intel Corp. (INTC) and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.'s (AMD) x86 designs in mobile computers and servers over the next several years.


I guess you have not seen the news about the new Intel transistor design? I wonder who will be reaping the benefit of that the most in ultra low consumption CPUs? Also, define 'mobile computers'. Because I can take my desktop to my friends pretty much anytime I want to.


RE: Swim
By phatboye on 5/11/2011 9:04:26 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I guess you have not seen the news about the new Intel transistor design? I wonder who will be reaping the benefit of that the most in ultra low consumption CPUs?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multigate_device#FinF...

A lot of manufacturing companies will be using something similar to Intel's Tri-gate technology. So what they are doing is nothing special. What is important about Intel's announcement is that they will be one of the first companies to deploy this technology.


RE: Swim
By icanhascpu on 5/11/2011 9:31:12 AM , Rating: 2
Key word in the post you replied to; most


RE: Swim
By Totally on 5/11/2011 11:22:00 AM , Rating: 2
when you're wrong, you're wrong. Man up.

They way you worded your post you are implying that this technology is exclusive to Intel -> no one will be able to compete. Tri-gate transistors are not really a game changer at that scale.


RE: Swim
By omnicronx on 5/11/2011 11:37:22 AM , Rating: 3
Well he's wrong, and at the same time not wrong. (not that this was the point he was trying to make)

This is not really new technology and has been in development for the better part of 10 years.

The idea that other manufacturers will simply be able to start using this technology just because Intel has now perfected its manufacturing process makes absolutely no sense.

While the technology itself may not be exclusive to Intel (not even sure if that is true, who knows what kind of patents that they hold with this particular implementation), in practice it essentially will be exclusive to Intel for at least a few years if not more.


RE: Swim
By icanhascpu on 5/11/2011 1:17:01 PM , Rating: 2
Man up? How about learn to read. The way I worded it with "most" would lead one to believe that they wont be the only ones to benefit from it. I cant stupid-proof everything I write.


RE: Swim
By MeesterNid on 5/11/2011 9:08:25 AM , Rating: 2
Use common sense and no formal definition is required. Is your desktop battery-powered and do you put it on your lap when you sit on the couch at home browsing the web?

I do agree with you on the new intel transistor design and the implications for mobile (as explained above) devices vs ARM.


RE: Swim
By Totally on 5/11/2011 11:14:47 AM , Rating: 2
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=define%3Amobile

portable != mobile

you are not using your desktop on the go, like in a cab, at an airport, on the plane, etc.


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov














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