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Introduces new typeface and branding in effort to move forward

It's no secret that, even before Nokia announced its "strategic partnership" with Microsoft, the most popular mobile OS on the planet, Symbian, was in the midst of a slow death. But the deal to bring Windows Phone 7 to Nokia devices certainly had a big impact in accelerating Symbian's decline.

Nokia's VP Purnima Kochikar has confirmed that Symbian will likely just fade away in an open letter to developers, despite the fact that there are a number of Symbian-based devices in the pipeline during the "transition period" of 2011-2012.

"In many markets, including markets where Symbian is currently the lead smartphone platform with significant market share such as China, India, Russia and Turkey, we will continue to make our Symbian portfolio as competitive as possible while we work with Microsoft to introduce Windows Phone," the letter says.

But when pressed to give a cut-off for the OS, Kochikar equivocates: "We cannot give you the date when Symbian will no longer be supported.

"Our intention is that when users come to the end of the natural lifecycle of their Symbian device they will make the change to a Nokia Windows Phone device and so it would not be in our interests to undermine their Nokia smartphone experience."

Meanwhile, Nokia has begun a rebranding phase, starting with a new font and look for promotional materials. The new font, dubbed "Nokia Pure" is meant to look, well, "pure and simple." The flow of the letters is intended to create "the impression of forward movement."

In addition to promotional materials, the new font will be used on Nokia devices. According to the Nokia blog, the font has been designed specifically for use in mobile and digital environments.


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RE: Uh oh!
By Aloonatic on 3/29/2011 5:21:40 AM , Rating: 3
Well, I'm from the EU. I've used a Symbian phone and thought it was pretty naff. Have been using an Android phone (HTC Desire) for the past year and it's good, but I'm not overly attached to it and I haven't invested enough in apps to make it overly expensive to switch over to WP7.

I don't want to sound like an Apple fan (because I'm not) but one thing that I agree with them about is the people want things that just work. Whether it's a Symbian, WP or an Android phone really doesn't matter to most people, unless they've spent a lot on apps, but I don't think that's the case. No one really cared about changing from dumb phone manufacturer to dumb phone manufacturer when they all had different interfaces and ways of doing their job. Just as long as what they moved to worked and was fairly intuitive, then they didn't care.

I'm looking forwards to seeing what Nokia and MS can do together, and I'm also hoping that they will be offering something in the next 6 months or so (with aggressive pricing too) when my contract runs out. :o)

Anyway, in brief, outside the world of tech message boards and fanboydom (in general) most people really don't care what their phones OS is called, just as long as it's a good product, it works and it's supported. There's no reason to believe that many people, when offered the chance to move to WP on their Nokias (rather than Symbian) will be too scared, considering that WP7 has been pretty well received technically (iOs and Android have not been without their problems too after all) and that it is backed by the financial, technical and familiar might of MS. Yes, MS needs to get it's marketing right of course, as the unknown is always scary. Especially now that people have a choice, because if they had a Symbian phone before, odds are it is just because they had no choice in the past anyway.


RE: Uh oh!
By xsilver on 3/30/2011 9:37:18 AM , Rating: 2
Agree - nokia has the largest market share not because of symbian, its because they make simple to operate phones with enough features that people want.

Plus I dont see why if the partnership doesnt work out, they can just adopt something else at a later date and still pocket the 1 billion dollars microsoft paid them. The money cant be for perpetuity?


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