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  (Source: ecoinstitution.com)
If the Interisland Wind Project brought 400 megawatts of wind power from Lanai and Molokai to Oahu as planned, this would bring the island's total wind power to 500 megawatts, meeting increasing energy needs

A new study has found that an additional 400 megawatts of wind power, coupled with existing wind farms and solar energy, could provide 25 percent of Oahu's projected electricity demand. 

The study, which is the Oahu Wind Integration Study, was conducted by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the Hawaiian Electric Company and General Electric Company. The study found that the energy needs of Oahu are increasing. Currently, low sulfur fuel oil (LSFO) and coal are burned annually to meet energy needs on the island.

But if the Interisland Wind Project brought 400 megawatts of wind power from Lanai and Molokai to Oahu as planned, this would bring the island's total wind power to 500 megawatts. This, along with 100 megawatts of solar power found on Oahu, could eliminate the need to burn 2.8 million barrels of LSFO and 132,000 tons of coal annually.

"The findings of this study show it is feasible to integrate large-scale wind and solar projects on Oahu but also have value beyond Hawaii," said Dr. Rick Rocheleau, Director of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute. "Both large mainland utilities and relatively small and/or isolated grids that wish to integrate significant amounts of renewable energy while maintaining reliability for their customers can learn from this study." 

The study also provided recommendations that should be combined with the additional wind power, which include increasing power reserves in order to help manage wind variability, providing cutting edge wind power forecasting, increasing ramp rates of Hawaiian Electric's thermal generating units, reducing minimum stable operating power of baseload generating units, providing severe weather monitoring and evaluating other resources that can contribute reserve. 

"To reach our renewable energy goals, we need to use all the resources available to us," said Robbie Alm, Hawaiian Electric executive vice president. "For Oahu, this includes the utility-scale solar, roof-top solar, waste-to-energy and on-island wind that we are pursuing. But on-island resources are not enough to meet Oahu's power needs." 

Alm added that the study shows the benefits of alternative energy technology, but presents financial and environmental challenges that must be overcome before it is implemented. However, he sees the study as being an "essential first step for the Interisland Wind Project."



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Next step: LED
By quiksilvr on 3/18/2011 10:56:42 AM , Rating: 2
Use LED lighting on everything. It's only a million people, it should totally be within the realm of possibility.




RE: Next step: LED
By therealnickdanger on 3/18/2011 11:26:48 AM , Rating: 4
As long as the lights don't give off more light than the low pressure sodium lights in place to restrict light pollution due to the observatories (Maui and Hawaii), they could do it.

I was on Hawaii (Big Island) about 5 years ago and witnessed the massive windfarm graveyard on the south side. Tons of rusted, broken windmills completely ruining the natural scenic beauty.

Please... not again.


RE: Next step: LED
By DanNeely on 3/18/2011 11:31:18 AM , Rating: 2
LPSV lights aren't mandated for outdoor usage around major astronomic observatories for the total amount of light they produce. It's the spectrum that is the important part. Instead of a broad spectrum LPSV concentrates all its light into a few narrow spectral lines that are easily filtered out without blocking the rest of the incoming light. Even phosporless LEDs have a significantly wider spectral curve, and aren't suitable replacements.


RE: Next step: LED
By therealnickdanger on 3/18/2011 11:41:49 AM , Rating: 2
Correct. I never said it was based on luminance.


RE: Next step: LED
By DanNeely on 3/18/2011 1:11:04 PM , Rating: 1
In that case, what did you mean by "As long as the lights don't give off more light than the low pressure sodium lights"? You never qualified it in any way to indicate you weren't looking at total output.


RE: Next step: LED
By therealnickdanger on 3/18/2011 2:31:53 PM , Rating: 2
I never qualified it to indicate I was.

Depending upon the LED used, it could open up more of the spectrum or less. But ultimately, LEDs can be better regardless of spectrum due entirely to their ability to dim extremely low (for use in "smart" lighting) and because they are extremely directional, resulting in much less light (of all spectrums) projecting into the atmosphere. There are many "dark skies" initiatives using LED for this very reason.


RE: Next step: LED
By heffeque on 3/19/2011 9:08:16 AM , Rating: 2
An huge factory burning oil or doing nuclear is a much nicer view than a wind farm, obviously.


RE: Next step: LED
By dsumanik on 3/20/2011 11:08:50 PM , Rating: 2
I think they should go the floating windfarm route personally...few key reasons:

-no chance of tsunami damage
-no chance of earthquake damage
-no chance of volcanic damage
-no reduction in useable island real estate, or invasion of pristine parklands.

Build a massive floating windfarm 50 miles off the coast out of the way of shipping lanes and line of sight in to harness the warm steady breeze that blows though the hawaiian islands daily.


RE: Next step: LED
By dsumanik on 3/20/2011 11:13:37 PM , Rating: 2
Another option for hawaii is geothermal

of course the limiting factor here is going to be cost.

Someone needs to start trumpeting the strategic importance of hawaii and the need for the military to not rely on fossil fuels and have the military pay for it all.


RE: Next step: LED
By DanNeely on 3/18/2011 11:28:16 AM , Rating: 2
Current full spectrum LEDs are not meaningfully more power efficient than CFLs. Some phosphorless types are; but their harsh blueish light isn't suitable for indoor use.

The main advantage LED bulbs will offer in the medium term is that you don't have to worry about mercury releases if you break them.


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/18/2011 12:17:59 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah I really don't know what to do with CFL bulbs that wear out. I had a CFL bulb die in 6 months. And you're not really supposed to just throw them in the trash.


RE: Next step: LED
By quiksilvr on 3/18/2011 12:44:24 PM , Rating: 2
Home Depot lets you recycle them for free.

Also, if you continue to have CFL bulbs die within a year, fun fact: you're not supposed to use them in bathrooms.


RE: Next step: LED
By wookie1 on 3/18/2011 1:35:53 PM , Rating: 2
What am I supposed to use in the bathrooms then?


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/18/2011 3:46:01 PM , Rating: 2
Especially once incandescent bulbs become essentially illegal in the US.


RE: Next step: LED
By Spuke on 3/18/2011 4:16:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Especially once incandescent bulbs become essentially illegal in the US.
I found an 12W 800 lumen LED on Home Depot's website. Color temp is 2700K. It's a Philips brand LED. It's $40. Supposed to be dimmable too. Going to try it out. If it's good then I'll order some more to replace the CFL's I have then eventually, all my lights.


RE: Next step: LED
By wookie1 on 3/18/2011 7:18:21 PM , Rating: 2
Holy crap! Between the 2 bathrooms in my house I've got like 16 "vanity" bulbs. Now I've gotta pay $640 to replace them instead of <$20?! After that I've got 4 ceiling fans with 3-4 bulbs each, plus other lights. This is a total crock to force us out of incandescent bulbs. I've converted the most used lights to CFL, not really that enamoured of them.


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/19/2011 9:54:29 AM , Rating: 2
Only $40 a bulb huh?

So only $1400 to replace all the bulbs in my house. Awesome!


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/18/2011 3:46:43 PM , Rating: 2
This was in a light fixture on my back patio. It wasn't even used. I have CFL bulbs in my bathroom and they are still going.


RE: Next step: LED
By bah12 on 3/18/2011 1:14:55 PM , Rating: 4
I just chunk em in a local river next to the school.


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/18/2011 3:48:53 PM , Rating: 2
I say we grind them up into those people's food who believe the government has the power to force us to use them.


RE: Next step: LED
By mellomonk on 3/18/11, Rating: 0
RE: Next step: LED
By Spuke on 3/18/2011 6:46:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Better yet, grind them up and feed them to those who think they have the right to do whatever they want
With the law and the Bill of Rights, we DO have the right to do what we want.


RE: Next step: LED
By FITCamaro on 3/19/2011 9:58:55 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah because its not like we can't produce more electricity. And as Spuke said, we do have the right. Me using more electricity effects me, not you.

Your solution replaces one product that uses more energy with another that poisons the soil and water when it burns out and is thrown away. Energy can be produced cleanly through nuclear power.


RE: Next step: LED
By knutjb on 3/19/2011 3:27:36 PM , Rating: 2
How else is China to reduce their pollution but to send it to us in the form of a government mandate.


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