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Sony Vaio S  (Source: Sony)

Vaio S sheet battery  (Source: Sony)
Notebook has new optional sheet battery to double run time

Sony today announced its new S-series notebook that is a 13.3” (1366 x 768) thin and light machine with a "sheet battery" option.

The notebook can be pre-ordered right now on the Sony Style store starting at $969.99. The notebook can be customized with CPUs up to the second-generation Core i7 and it can be fitted with hybrid graphics with 1GB of dedicated memory (AMD Radeon HD 6630M). The new S-series notebook is just under an inch thick and weighs 3.8 pounds. 

The trackpad on the S notebook is larger than on other Vaio offerings and the machine can be optioned with Blu-ray. It has a USB 3.0 port for fast connectivity with external storage and other gear. The case of the notebook is made from magnesium for strength and lightness, and the machine is compatible with Intel Wireless Display.

One of the more interesting features of the notebook is that the machine is launching with an extended “sheet battery” accessory that will sell for about $150. The sheet battery connects to the bottom of the notebook and can provide more power to the user without them having to power down to switch batteries.

Sony claims that the sheet battery doubles the runtime of the computer (up to 15 hours). When attached the external sheet battery will be used before the computer starts to use its internal battery. The internal has a claimed battery life of 7.5 hours per charge.

The notebook can be purchased in black or white colors and has up to 750GB of storage.

“We continue to raise the bar when it comes to the mobile computing experience,” said Mike Lucas, senior vice president of Networked and Technologies and Services Division at Sony Electronics. “The VAIO S Series laptop makes no compromises by offering the ultimate, full-featured ultra-mobile PC.”



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RE: Meh...
By corduroygt on 3/7/2011 10:59:27 AM , Rating: 2
Computers have pretty much always had progressive scan displays, unless you go far back.


RE: Meh...
By chromal on 3/7/2011 1:23:40 PM , Rating: 2
For a while my family owned an IBM PS/1 i80486sx/25 with an integral XGA adapter. If I recall, it could only do 1024x768 in Interlaced mode. This being about circa '93.

By the mid-90s, video adapters and monitors had progressed to the point that higher horizontal and vertical refresh frequencies had become inexpensive. VESA standard modes became widely supported and not much really changed until DVI took off around '05.


RE: Meh...
By Fleeb on 3/9/2011 2:26:46 PM , Rating: 2
It was more on so many people attaching "p" to everything - all resolution. I only heard of 240p, 576p, 288p, 480p, 720p, 1080p and 2160p but not exactly "768p". I still think that HDTVs (in the context of HDTVs may be to an extent monitors [?]) which have 768 horizontal scanlines just process 720p sources.


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