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  (Source: techshake.info)
Lawmakers in Chihuahua have asked federal authorities to ban the game due to its themes that reflect the current crime situation in Juarez

An upcoming Ubisoft video game, which closely resembles the real crime and murder taking place in the Mexico border city of Juarez, has critics upset to the point where some want the game banned. 

The video game is "Call of Juarez: The Cartel," and it contains themes of murder, torture and kidnapping in regards to the war between drug cartels within the city. The game is an update to an Old West series previously made by Ubisoft, and is now set in present-day Juarez. 

While several other first-person shooting games tend to be violent, the problem with this game specifically is that it reflects real situations occurring within the city, which is "not something to be made light of," according to former Juarez Mayor Jose Reyes-Ferriz.  

Juarez has consistent problems with drug cartel violence and is one of Mexico's most dangerous cities. Currently, the Juarez cartel and the Sinaloa cartel are going head-to-head in a turf war in this particular region, fighting for drug-dealing territory and prime smuggling routes within Juarez. During the first 40 days of this year, the average number of people killed in Juarez was about eight per day.  

To make matters worse, Juarez just experienced one of its bloodiest weekends yet. Over a three-day period this past weekend, 53 people were killed in Ciudad, Juarez.  

Reyes-Ferriz noted that Ubisoft's new video game based on crime and murder within the city will not only raise a sensitive subject for its citizens, but will also reinforce certain negative ideas about the city to those outside of Juarez. 

"Of course, it is something that those of us who love our city don't like at all," said Reyes-Ferriz. "It's something that demeans our city."

Reyes-Ferriz isn't the only one who feels this way. On Sunday, lawmakers in Chihuahua requested that federal authorities ban the game in Mexico. Chihuahua congressman Ricardo Boone Salmon stated, "It is true there is a serious crime situation, which we are not trying to hide. But we also should not expose children to these kind of scenarios so that they are going to grow up with this kind of image and lack of values." 

The Facebook page for "Call of Juarez: The Cartel" has also received criticism from gamers.  

"Doesn't it seem a little socially irresponsible to capitalize and/or glorify what is ACTUALLY happening (violence, murder) because of the illegal dug trade in North America?" said a user on the game's discussion wall. "If this game doesn't have a strong 'illegal drugs should be legalized so that there is no crime related to drug trafficking' theme, then I'm boycotting Ubisoft forever."

Reyes-Ferriz had hoped that all the criticism would make Ubisoft rethink the game's release, but believes that it's probably unlikely that they won't sell it at this point. The game is already available for pre-order and is set to go on sale for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 consoles this summer.

"I know the process is not month-to-month or week-to-week," said Reyes-Ferriz. "I know it takes a couple of years to do a project like that. I think with all the headway they have, there's not going to be much that can be done."

In response to all of the negative views regarding the new game, Ubisoft released a written statement saying that the game was in no way meant to directly imitate or mock the events occurring in Juarez.

"'Call of Juarez: The Cartel' is purely fictional and developed by the team at Techland for entertainment purposes only," said Ubisoft in its written statement. "While 'Call of Juarez: The Cartel' touches on subjects relevant to current events in Juarez, it does so in a fictional manner that makes the gaming experience feel more like being immersed in an action movie than in a real-life situation. 

"Ubisoft is an entertainment company and our intention is to create a unique experience for video game fans."



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By Suntan on 2/23/2011 3:56:05 PM , Rating: 2
If the market for drugs in America became non-existent tomorrow, do you think that would suddenly make those areas peaceful areas of legitimate commerce?

If drugs were legalized today, would you then advocate to legalize the selling of young woman the next day to “solve” the human trafficking that these cartels would then turn to tomorrow?

-Suntan


By Aenslead on 2/23/2011 4:42:48 PM , Rating: 2
I do like your assumption, but I will not reply to it because it will never happen. Impressive amounts of banks and politicians in the US make their fortunes out of drug business.

All we need is a DEA like organization that keeps controll of the routes and determines what gangs can operate where and how, just like in the US, where there is "peace amongst the gangs".

Mark my words: American and Mexican economy would COLLAPSE in a matter of months if drug trafficking ceased. Why do you think it's not been legalized? It's the best way to get huge amounts of money around. In cash.


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