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Nokia plans on phasing out Symbian in favor of Windows Phone 7, which will likely propel Microsoft into the number 2 spot in global smart phone sales by OS.  (Source: Nokia via Engadget)

With Microsoft focusing on providing a slick OS for its phones, Nokia can focus on its hardware fully, for the first time in some time.  (Source: Genius Reviews)
Nokia's new CEO also fires back against criticism by Google

While Symbian isn't exactly a household name in America, for years it sat on top of global smart phone sales, thanks to market leader Nokia's support.  With today's announcement of a strategic partnership with Microsoft, Symbian's owner Nokia let slip a market-moving detail: it is phasing out Symbian for Windows Phone 7.

And just like that Windows Phone 7 has been slated to, in all likelihood, claim the #2 spot  in smart phone global sales by operating system.

I. Becoming a Giant Overnight

The decision to phase out Symbian was revealed in a slide deck presented by Nokia's new CEO Stephen Elop and Nokia CFO, Timo Ihamuotila, at Nokia's Capital Markets Day.

Nokia will continue to support Meego, its joint Linux smart phone OS which it is developing with Intel.  But Meego will only be on a small selection of handsets, where as Windows Phone 7 will be loaded on the majority of Nokia smart phones, according to illustrations in the deck.

It can not be discounted the role Mr. Elop's former executive position at Microsoft played in the two companies coming together.  However, beyond any personal connections, the move makes sense on a number of levels for both firms.  

For Microsoft it's a complete game changer.  Rather than have to chip away and slowly rise in market share like Android, it's punched an instant ticket to the big time.  And with updates soon airing to smooth out its OS's rough edges, Microsoft looks to be in a very, very good position.  It may still lack a handful of features found in iOS and Android, but it arguably offers the most innovative and intuitive interface on the market today.  And its app market is rapidly expanding, further remedying one of its few remaining weaknesses.

For Nokia the move is also a huge opportunity.  As the recent slip to number 2 showed, people aren't exactly very enthusiastic about Symbian anymore.  With its OS budget dramatically slashed over the next few years, Nokia indicates that it will focus more on hardware.  This could be just what the doctor ordered, for the world's struggling largest phone maker.  And the partnership with Microsoft should allow it to expand its smart phone offerings and visibility in the large U.S. market -- a place where it has struggled in recent years.

Probably the biggest risk is for Microsoft to alienate its other partners, like HTC, LG, and Samsung.  All the Nokia hoopla may turn them off and make them devote more effort to Android -- or it could have little effect.  Which is the case remains to be seen.

II. Nokia Fires Back at Google Over "Turkey" Remark

In related news, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop lit up Twitter with a sharp-witted response to Google's earlier insult.  This morning Google engineer Vic Gundrota posted, "two turkeys don't make an eagle, but at least the consumer will have more choice for the menu, as #nokia goes windows"

Showcasing his sound knowledge of American history, Mr. Elop fired back [post], "Or this: Two bicycle makers, from Dayton Ohio, one day decide to fly."

It seems a bit unfair to label Windows Phone 7 a turkey given its radical reinvention of the Windows smart phone platform and relatively short evaluation period on the market.  Whether it's a turkey or an eagle should be seen in a couple of years -- after all, Android looked as much or more like a "turkey" in its first year or so on the market as Windows Phone 7 might today.

More than likely the typically reserved Google is lashing out, based on a bit of discomfort.  Before it seemed to have no real competition for the world #1 spot in the smart phone race.  Apple was unlikely to challenge it, as it was forever constrained to a single proprietary handset model.  And a sinking Nokia seemed equally unlikely to challenge.

Now a resurgent Nokia is back and will soon be offering handsets with a hot new OS -- Windows Phone 7.  The picture has changed dramatically, overnight.

Thus, much like Apple noisily berated Google as Android emerged as a true challenger to iOS in 2010, Google's mud-flinging appears to be found in a bit of frustration and concern.  Amusing commentary aside, it's a sign that Google is taking this merger seriously -- and is likely more than a little worried.


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RE: Good.
By Tony Swash on 2/11/2011 3:01:39 PM , Rating: -1
quote:
lets not get into the fact that timelines done line up, certain facts are incorrect and some of the responses don't make any sense


Lets go into them.

Why not just post some corrected timelines, correct the incorrect facts?

How about some more input. Here is an interesting, if trifle long, piece from the 'Communities Dominate Brands site.

http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/brands/2011/...

I couple of the juicer quotes:

quote:
For the first time ever, a technology brand that was leading in the market, abandoned its platform and selected one of the smallest rivals.

Microsoft which built its massive and profitable empire on the PC, was never able to do so in mobile (their peak market share was about 12%, and they currently have 3% but that includes the about-to-be extinct Windows Mobile. Microsoft's new OS, the one Nokia will adopt, called Phone7 has only 1.5% in Q4. Nokia had 33% for the whole year; Who is the winner here?).


quote:
This is the same Microsoft that stopped having annual release numbers (years in the software version Windows 95, Windows 98 etc) because they could not release new software BY YEAR ! If you thought Nokia delays with N8 were bad, that was only delayed by a couple of quarters. Microsoft can't even commit to releases by year.

The 'partnership' with Microsoft is very dangerous on many levels. On the one hand, this is Microsoft, the company previously known as the evil empire. How did it gain that wonderful nick-name? From all sorts of dirty tricks and lawsuits. Do you remember how Micrsoft got into smartphones? You're too young to remember. When Microsoft announced it was coming to smartphones, they selected UK based Sendo, as their launch customer and handset maker - then when the first Sendo handset was almost ready for launch - Microsoft pulled them from the deal, sued them silly, and went with Taiwanese HTC. The lawsuits ran for years, Sendo argued that Microsoft had stolen their ideas, not delivered on any software promises, were delayed on all schedules, and then gave Sendo's proprietary handset and market knowledge to HTC. Nice. The lawsuit was finally settled years later. But this is 'normal' for Microsoft.

How well did its partnership with HTC go? HTC is the company that manufactured more than half of all smartphones on the Windows Mobile OS with more than a dozen other handset makers doing far less than half. HTC was so disgusted by Microsoft by the end, that they announced loudly they were switching to Android the moment that became available - to the point, HTC said they would not even use the next (which turned out to be last) version of Windows Mobile. Thats Microsoft partership for you. Motorola, another early Windows Mobile client, was so fed up with Microsoft's games, they said no Phone 7 smartphones ever! Moto said they only do Android. Samsung, LG, SonyEricsson and HTC give lip-service to Microsoft, all putting most of their effort to Android where they have a friendly OS provider (as in 'do no evil' haha).


RE: Good.
By Cheesew1z69 on 2/11/2011 4:08:57 PM , Rating: 2
RE: Good.
By bigboxes on 2/13/2011 9:12:16 PM , Rating: 1
Welcome back, reader1. :eyeroll:


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