backtop


Print 67 comment(s) - last by Lerianis.. on Feb 14 at 8:42 AM

AMD benefitting from Intel's $1B mistake

Intel must be the gift that keeps on giving to AMD. In late 2009, Intel was forced to pay AMD $1.25B for its years of monopolistic behavior in the processor market. Now, AMD is benefiting directly from Intel's Series 6 (Cougar Point) chipset woes

In late January, Intel explained that it had uncovered a SATA problem with Cougar Point that could cause performance degradation over time. As a result, Intel stopped shipment of the affected chipsets, will take a charge of roughly $1B, and won't start shipping updated chipsets to its partners until later this month (volume shipments to customers will come later).

Not surprisingly, AMD is profiting greatly from Intel's gaffe according to Fox Business News. "We have some customers and retailers who have come to us specifically as a result of Intel's chip problem," stated AMD exec Leslie Sobon. "Some retailers have had to take things off their shelves, so they call us to ask what they could get from our OEMs that's similar. And OEMs are asking us for product, as well." 

Fox Business News goes on to report that computer manufacturers that sell both Intel and AMD systems are coming to the latter to supply more processors/chipsets to make up for the shortfall due to the Cougar Point woes. 

AMD earlier this year unveiled its Fusion processors that feature onboard DirectX 11 graphics. AMD says that netbooks using the chipset will have over 10 hours of battery life.

AMD has also been in the news recently thanks to the ouster of Dirk Meyer as CEO. Meyer was removed from his position due to a lack of vision when it comes to mobile computing devices like smartphones and tablets.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Serves them right...
By silverblue on 2/9/2011 9:21:25 AM , Rating: 2
Maybe so, but only for the late Athlon X2 era into the Phenom era. Bulldozer requires a new chipset. I believe the Core 2s used the same socket as latterday P4s, so Intel has offered this level of upgradeability before.

I can't see how this really helping AMD unless people are avoiding Intel like the plague; we may have to wait for quarterly sales figures.


RE: Serves them right...
By mcnabney on 2/9/2011 9:30:48 AM , Rating: 5
The biggest help that AMD is getting, unmentioned in the article, is that the chipset bug has pushed Sandy Bridge back from an effective January release to a late March release - much closer to the Bulldozer launch. This essentially does two things. It makes the new CPU launches nearly concurrent - which is great for AMD who was running behind. It also puts the thought of Intel quality issues into the minds of customers, making the AMD offerings more appealing even though there probably isn't a higher risk.


RE: Serves them right...
By Flunk on 2/9/2011 9:36:18 AM , Rating: 2
Actually no, the AM3+ socket that Bulldozer will user is slated to be backwards compatible with AM3 boards.

Intel's current socket list is preitty huge, they have 3 different sockets for different markets and now they're bringing out the LGA 1355, which is basically the same as the LGA 1356 but with one less ground pin. Now that's a rip-off.


RE: Serves them right...
By silverblue on 2/9/2011 9:52:00 AM , Rating: 2
You do have a point in that AM3r2 allows you to use your AM3 Phenom and Athlon II processors, however it's different to using Phenom IIs in AM2+ boards as well as AM3 - the new CPU technology cannot be installed in older boards. Still, if you do have a current AM3 setup, all you realistically need to replace is the CPU, cooler and motherboard. Phenom II sold well enough so allowing ease of adoption has to be a good thing for Bulldozer.


RE: Serves them right...
By nafhan on 2/9/2011 10:23:37 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
all you realistically need to replace is the CPU, cooler and motherboard
that would also allow you to move to an Intel setup :)


RE: Serves them right...
By silverblue on 2/9/2011 11:05:48 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, but realistically, you'll be paying more. The saving grace for Intel in this case is that you don't need a triple-channel memory kit for anything except S1366.


RE: Serves them right...
By MGSsancho on 2/9/2011 3:31:06 PM , Rating: 2
you don't need triple channel or dual channel, most systems work fine with one dimm. more memory (speed, capacity, channels, etc) are a luxury . ;P


RE: Serves them right...
By Kurz on 2/9/2011 9:53:32 AM , Rating: 2
Umm... they moved the clock generator from the motherboard to the processor. BLCK can't be overclocked.

SO the sockets are completely different now thats why there is a change.


RE: Serves them right...
By DanNeely on 2/9/2011 10:35:56 AM , Rating: 2
Are you referring to 1155/56?

If not, s1355 has disappeared from roadmaps a while back. The 1366 replacement will be s2011 which has the quad channel memory support that will be needed for the 8 core processors Intel intends to launch on the socket (current Intel designs need 1 channel per 2 physical cores to avoid bottle necking in memory intensive apps).

Depending on the amount of pressure from Bulldozer and the availability of DDR4 ram next year, something like s1355 might return next year in order to support triple channel ram for mass market hex core ivy bridge chips. Since the rumored S1355 would have supported 24 PCIe lanes vs 16 in 1155 I doubt the rumored socket would be resurrected exactly the same as before, if Intel wanted to boost bandwidth upgrading to PCIe 3.0 would allow for doing so at a lower cost.


"We’re Apple. We don’t wear suits. We don’t even own suits." -- Apple CEO Steve Jobs














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki