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Intel is working to fix a design flaw in its Sandy Bridge chipsets relating to SATA performance

Intel has just issues a statement regarding its Series 6 (Cougar Point) chipset and a design flaw that has been uncovered. The company reports the following:

As part of ongoing quality assurance, Intel Corporation has discovered a design issue in a recently released support chip, the Intel 6 Series, code-named Cougar Point, and has implemented a silicon fix. In some cases, the Serial-ATA (SATA) ports within the chipsets may degrade over time, potentially impacting the performance or functionality of SATA-linked devices such as hard disk drives and DVD-drives. The chipset is utilized in PCs with Intel's latest Second Generation Intel Core processors, code-named Sandy Bridge. Intel has stopped shipment of the affected support chip from its factories. Intel has corrected the design issue, and has begun manufacturing a new version of the support chip which will resolve the issue. The Sandy Bridge microprocessor is unaffected and no other products are affected by this issue.

As Intel notes, the actual Sandy Bridge processor is not affected by this design error, and it stopped shipment of chipsets that are hampered by this SATA performance degradation problem. Intel also states that it will begin shipping "fixed" chipsets towards the end of February to its customers.

"The systems with the affected support chips have only been shipping since January 9th and the company believes that relatively few consumers are impacted by this issue," stated Intel in the press release. "The only systems sold to an end customer potentially impacted are Second Generation Core i5 and Core i7 quad core based systems. 

This little gaffe is expected to cost Intel $1B USD ($300M hit to revenue, $700M to repair/replace boards).

Intel made headlines last week when it named Blacked Eye Peas front man will.i.am as its Director of Creative Innovation.



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RE: Major Flaw Indeed, $1b hit for Intel
By bupkus on 1/31/2011 4:50:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In the meantime, AMD suddenly see a light for Bulldozer
Exactly.
AMD had that huge problem with their first gen Phenom. I think it was the Phenom 9600 Agena. It couldn't run a 64-bit OS. I had a friend who bought one later in its life cycle from newegg. It was in June 2008 back when the swing to a 64-bit OS was getting real traction. I think he later sold it on ebay to someone else equally clueless.
Did AMD take responsibility and accept returns? Forget-about-it.
quote:
Those initial fixed chipsets are probably going to go to to OEMs first.
My guess some OEMs will take all those flawed boards and build a work around solution and sell them at discount through discount labels.
Damn, someone is gonna make a lot of money off of this issue.


By tamalero on 2/1/2011 10:27:56 AM , Rating: 2
the first gen Phenom was not AGENA. it was BARCELONA.
unless you mean exclusively for the desktop parts, where it indeed was AGENA.
and the only bug it had was a rare TLB when using all the mem slots and running very specified calculations.

it was overblown by intel RP, all the bad pres sounded like it was the end of the world..

I still find laugheable how when intel comits one mistake, everyone seems to go to "I applaud them!" when they resolve the issue.
but when its AMD "how awful!". (they did admit of the error as well so yeah..)

I still feel sorry for those who pre-ordered or already bought the sandy bridge boards, I wonder how painful might be the return and replacement... specially laptops.


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