backtop


Print 35 comment(s) - last by rs2.. on Feb 1 at 3:07 AM


Netgear Chairman and CEO Patrick Lo.  (Source: Flickr.com/Jeremy Toeman)
Says Apple will eventually lose out to the more open Android

Netgear Chairman and CEO Patrick Lo has never been a shy guy, as evidenced most recently by his "scathing attack" on Apple CEO Steve Jobs in an interview with The Sydney Morning Herald.

"Steve Jobs wants to suffocate the distribution so even though he doesn't own the content he could basically demand a ransom," Lo told The Herald, referring to the closed delivery model of iTunes.

This was just one specific criticism from a broad discussion of closed and proprietary products vs. open ecosystems like Google's Android. Lo said that Apple has succeeded so far because they "own the market" of many of their products, like the iPod with MP3 players. However, Lo predicted that, like Betamax vs. VHS and Mac vs. Windows, the open platform -- again referring to Android -- would win in the long run.

"Once Steve Jobs goes away, which is probably not far away, then Apple will have to make a strategic decision on whether to open up the platform," Lo told The Herald. "Ultimately a closed system just can't go that far ... If they continue to close it and let Android continue to creep up then it's pretty difficult as I see it."

Lo predicted that Android would eventually become the standard for a range of consumer electronic devices, pointing to its recent overtaking of Apple in global market share as evidence.

He also attributed Jobs' trashing of Adobe Flash as nothing more than an issue of ego.

As for Windows Phone 7, Lo said that Microsoft had fallen behind its competitors and would continue to languish there. "Microsoft is over - game over - from my point of view," he told The Herald.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Hmm
By amanojaku on 1/31/2011 10:27:06 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
1) For all of Apple's faults, they actually make a very stylish, quality product. Fact is though, most people just don't care that much about open vs closed source. If it's cool, and it plays your music, they'll buy it. That's Apple's intent.
That's a matter of opinion. I generally like Apple's minimalist design, but I think all incarnations of the iPhone are ugly. I just can't get into them, even the revamped 4.
quote:
2) If Apple actually allowed iOS to be used on more than a single platform, it would be the #1 used phone operating system on the market. Android is a great OS (I use it!), and I love the fact that it is open source, but let's make no illusions to the fact that part of the reason it's #1 is because it's the only quality alternative outside of the iPhone.
That may be true, but only because it was first to market and there was a lot of hype behind it. Additionally, no one pushed the iOS, they pushed the iPhone. Big difference. When Android came out people (meaning the consumer market, not techs) were pushing the G1. We will never get to see a true comparison of the iOS on another platform, and Android legally on the iPhone, unfortunately.
quote:
Microsoft has a good thing going with WP7, and I rarely believe nay-sayers who think something doesn't have a chance. Everyone thought that about the iPhone when it was first introduced, and look where it is now? If they play their cards right, Microsoft can create a product here with a sizable amount of marketshare. It will take time, but they do have one thing going for them, and that's the Bing search engine (Why do you think Microsoft even got into the phone OS market to begin with?).
Agreed, but you have to admit MS has been screwing around lately. The perception is the product isn't fully-featured or stable, which may or may not be the truth, but that's damaging enough. Personally, my money is on Windows Phone 8; 7 is just too new to be fully optimized. I think MS should have just tested the water with 7, but now that it's reputation is this bad it has to be more committed to 7's success.
quote:
But we'll see. A phone is a phone at the end of the day, right? :P
I sleep with it. I eat with it. It sits next to me in the car. At work. On the train. In front of the TV. I use it in the bathroom. I touch it more than I touch my girlfriend. It stores everything I've ever seen, read, heard, or known. We have a special relationship that no mere phone can hope to achieve.

=D


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki