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Microsoft isn't overly concerned about its struggles in the tablet industry, according to a top executive.  (Source: Reuters)
Company is unconcerned about the iPad and its Android counterparts

Jean-Philippe Courtois, president of Microsoft International, in an interview with Reuters, delved into the topic of tablets.  When asked whether Microsoft was concerned about the iPad and other tablets affecting the company's dominance of the PC market, he states, "Devices are going to go and come."

Microsoft is currently partnering with Intel to roll out 10 or more Windows tablets this year.  But those tablets, like the currently available HP Slate 500, don't have an operating system refined for touch (they run Windows 7).  And while they may offer compatibility for some files that competing tablets cannot (e.g. the iOS-powered iPad and Android devices), they are expected to also have inferior battery life, as Intel Atom SoCs are currently less power-efficient than competitive ARM SoCs used in these rivals.

In the long term Microsoft plans to fix those problems by embracing ARM and releasing a version of Windows fine-tuned for tablets.  Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer announced that Windows 8 will support ARM processors at CES 2011.  Much like Android 3.0 Honeycomb, Microsoft’s Windows 8 will also have a build refined for a touch-driven tablet world.

But Windows 8 may not arrive until 2012 -- or later.

Recent reports revealed that when tablets are factored in to Apple's PC market share, it jumps to number two on the list of top worldwide PC sellers, passing Dell.  And Android devices are heating up too, with the Samsung Galaxy Tab selling well and Honeycomb devices launching this Spring.

Mr. Courtois says that even if Microsoft faces an uphill battle in the tablet market, those problems will be offset by Microsoft information technology gains in developing markets.  He states, "We see some growth across the world both in developed countries and in emerging countries and that helps the IT spending (outlook)."



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RE: The future of Microsoft and tablets
By themaster08 on 1/30/2011 4:32:19 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why did previous generations of tablets fail to catch on in the common market? High prices.
Not forgetting that tablets were virtually unheard of. It's not because people didn't want them, it's because people didn't know what they were (at least until Apple's marketing team got in on the act).

I've seen one or two iPads in some businesses. They're mostly used for note-taking, remote desktop and VPN purposes. They're easier to carry around and have longer battery life than traditional Windows-based tablets, allowing users to carry them for longer periods of time, and allowing the user to be more portable.

Beyond said tasks, they're virtually useless in business. As soon as those Microsoft tablets are released with the right size/weight and consumer attention, the iPad's existence in the business world will become less so than it already is. Minimal integration in the network. Exchange set up is dire. No remote assistance. Fragmentation of platforms. Lack of provision of software installation/updates. No multi-user capabilities. Need to sync with PC. High price for minimal business features.

Tony has quite clearly never worked in the IT industry. He seems to believe that the consumer market is pushing the business market. Some businesses may be enticed by consumer-oriented devices, however most companies are trying to spend as little as possible, and get as much as possible out of their investments. Most of our clients are still running 5 year old PCs and seem content enough with them to not even consider an upgrade, let alone spend £400+ on each employee purchasing iPads for them.


RE: The future of Microsoft and tablets
By Tony Swash on 1/30/2011 7:09:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Not forgetting that tablets were virtually unheard of. It's not because people didn't want them, it's because people didn't know what they were (at least until Apple's marketing team got in on the act).

I've seen one or two iPads in some businesses. They're mostly used for note-taking, remote desktop and VPN purposes. They're easier to carry around and have longer battery life than traditional Windows-based tablets, allowing users to carry them for longer periods of time, and allowing the user to be more portable.

Beyond said tasks, they're virtually useless in business. As soon as those Microsoft tablets are released with the right size/weight and consumer attention, the iPad's existence in the business world will become less so than it already is. Minimal integration in the network. Exchange set up is dire. No remote assistance. Fragmentation of platforms. Lack of provision of software installation/updates. No multi-user capabilities. Need to sync with PC. High price for minimal business features.

Tony has quite clearly never worked in the IT industry. He seems to believe that the consumer market is pushing the business market. Some businesses may be enticed by consumer-oriented devices, however most companies are trying to spend as little as possible, and get as much as possible out of their investments. Most of our clients are still running 5 year old PCs and seem content enough with them to not even consider an upgrade, let alone spend £400+ on each employee purchasing iPads for them.


Nice reassuring narrative for Microsoft fans but the reality seems to be oddly different.

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/01/26/ipho...


RE: The future of Microsoft and tablets
By themaster08 on 1/30/2011 7:21:02 AM , Rating: 2
A comparison of iOS vs. Android adoption in enterprise bears absolutely no relevance to anything I mentioned.


RE: The future of Microsoft and tablets
By Tony Swash on 1/30/2011 8:36:22 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
As soon as those Microsoft tablets are released with the right size/weight and consumer attention, the iPad's existence in the business world will become less so than it already is.


How long will it take in your opinion before we see these "Microsoft tablets" and why do you think it hasn't it happened already?

Personally I think the RIM Playbook is a bigger competitor to iPad in Enterprise than anything we have seen from the Microsoft OEMs.


By themaster08 on 1/30/2011 9:16:37 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
How long will it take in your opinion before we see these "Microsoft tablets" and why do you think it hasn't it happened already?
Windows tablets are readily available, yet virtually unheard of. Whilst they have seamless enterprise integration properties, they're in essence just full-size laptops with swivel touchscreens. That makes them a not-so-good choice for lugging around the office simply just taking notes.

The iPad has opened this market further, but its business properties are very limited. This so-called new market will allow OEMs to gain traction in the business world with seamless enterprise integration at a price point that will entice businesses to consider them.

Netbook tablet hybrids such as the upcoming Samsung TX100 fill a gap that not even the iPad can. A fully fledged OS capable of full enterprise integration, with the size/weight and battery life necessary for comfortable portability, and price point to justify purchasing over devices such as the iPad.


RE: The future of Microsoft and tablets
By Taft12 on 1/30/2011 8:39:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Tony has quite clearly never worked in the IT industry. He seems to believe that the consumer market is pushing the business market.


It was the consumer maker pushing the business market that led to so many Microsoft shops in the first place. There was a time DEC and Sun boxes were the tools of business.


By SPOOFE on 1/30/2011 9:30:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It was the consumer maker pushing the business market that led to so many Microsoft shops in the first place

There's overlap, to be sure. People that work on Windows at the office all day will be more comfortable working on Windows at home. And dominance in the consumer space can give you the funds to push into or dominate the corporate space.

But it's not a given; what consumer products does IBM make these days, for instance?


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