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OCZ Vertex 3 Pro
Strong SSD revenues prompt OCZ to quickly abandon DRAM products

When it comes to performance upgrades for computing systems, enthusiasts have been moving in large numbers to solid state drives. Upgrading a system from an "archaic" hard disk drive (HDD) to a solid state drive (SSD) can make an immediate difference in boot speeds, application launch times, and overall system performance.

OCZ Technology, once primarily known for its DRAM/memory products, has in recent years expanded its product portfolio to include cooling products and power supplies. Another product category that has seen large gains for the company has been the SSD market.

OCZ Technology saw a 325 percent increase in revenues from its SSD business for fiscal Q3 2011 versus the previous year. Q3 2011 SSD revenues were also up 105 percent compared to Q2 2011. 

"SSD revenue accounted for 78% of our revenue and just by itself exceeds our historical quarterly revenue totals across all categories, thus reinforcing our decision to discontinue our remaining DRAM products," said OCZ Technology CEO Ryan Peterson. 

Thanks to the strong performance of its SSD portfolio, and the overall weakness in the global DRAM market, OCZ is accelerating its plans to exit the DRAM market.

"We still have some commitment on the memory side moving forward and will continue with certain SKUs for a period of time, but the amount of memory sales are going to be non-material to our overall business," said OCZ CMO Alex Mei in a phone interview with DailyTech. "Memory sales continues to shrink as an overall portion of our business to the point where it was not as significant."

OCZ showcased its SSD prowess last week with the announcement of the Vertex 3 Pro SSD family. The new drives feature a SandForce SF-2582 SATA III/6Gbps compliant controller that provides maximum read speeds of 550MB/sec and maximum write speeds of 525MB/sec.



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Only a temporary high
By semo on 1/11/2011 3:36:36 AM , Rating: 1
All credit to OCZ for spotting something good rubbing it in naysayers' noses but the fact is that any tom dick and harry it seems can make an SSDs these days (just like RAM).

What if the SSD market turns into something like the HDD one where the manufacturers brand their own products? Imagine sandforce is bought by Seagate, IMFT becomes IFT and Toshiba stops selling its SSD parts to other companies.

I think OCZ are thinking short term. Or are they planning to start designing their own controllers/firmware perhaps?




RE: Only a temporary high
By Beenthere on 1/11/2011 7:36:56 AM , Rating: 2
I suspect OCZ is thinking how can we save a sinking ship? I suspect they will be gone in a year or so.


RE: Only a temporary high
By azander on 1/11/2011 8:58:07 PM , Rating: 2
Hi semo, thanks for your comments. There is no doubt that SSDs will become more mainstream, and we are actually constantly focusing on both improving performance as well as driving down price to make SSDs more affordable to mainstream consumers. The price per GB for SSDs in general has come down a great deal making them a much more viable option for more consumers, and that helps foster more adoption.

While I can’t comment too much on development details I can say we will be coming out with more products beyond just the SATA and PCIe interface and we already have a firmware team that works on both client and enterprise solutions. There are still a lot of ways to add value for clients with solid state drives including performance, enhanced reliability, custom interfaces and form factors just to name a few.


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