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Prius V

Prius V interior

Prius C
After selling over one million Prius vehicles, Toyota expands the line

The hybrid that everyone loves to hate is getting a companion model. While the Prius MPV has been rumored for quite some time, Toyota only recently began to drop hints that the larger model was on the way. Today, however, Toyota made it official.

The current Prius started out as a sedan, but transitioned to a hatchback in its second generation. The new model, the Prius V (the “V” stands for versatility), brings a bit more utility to the Prius platform with a more upright rear hatch and a higher roof for 50 percent greater cargo volume.

“This is no ordinary family.  It’s a modern family with a Prius for everyone,” said Bob Carter, Toyota Division group vice president and general manager.  “The Prius v is an all-new dedicated hybrid vehicle, and all future Prius family members will be as well.  They will all share common Prius attributes but will be unique, with a special appeal to different buyers.”

When it comes to the powertrain, there aren't any surprises. The Prius V still uses the same 1.8-liter gasoline engine found in its smaller sibling along with the same Synergy Hybrid Drive.

Fuel economy for Toyota’s latest hybrid gets an impressive 42 mpg in the city, and 38 mpg on the highway (40 mpg combined). For comparison, the standard Prius is rated at 51/48 (50 mpg combined).

The Prius MPV will be going toe-to-toe with Ford’s new C-MAX Hybrid. Ford hasn’t released official EPA numbers for the vehicle yet, but the company does say that it will get better fuel economy than the Fusion Hybrid that is rated at 42/36. So it’s highly likely that Ford’s hybrid will get even better fuel economy than the Prius V.

The Prius V will be available to purchase later this summer.

Toyota also unveiled a Prius C, a vehicle that is smaller than the standard hatchback. It is aimed at young adults and will get better fuel economy than the current's Prius' already impressive 50 mpg combined. The vehicle will debut in production form around this time next year.

If the Prius C looks familiar to you, it's because Toyota debuted a similar hybrid concept, the FT-CH, last year at the Detroit Auto Show. The Prius C is a further refinement of that design.



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RE: 40 is that all?
By Keeir on 1/10/2011 3:36:38 PM , Rating: 2
Good response

you forgot the following

1. US testing cycles are significant different and more challenging than EU and Japan cycles. (Even Pre-2008 EPA delievered consistently lower results)
2. Real World =! EPA.

EPA testing is not meant to predict the mileage that someone will get in the real world. EPA testing is meant merely as a comparison method between cars. Each and every car that gets rated with the EPA method must drive a very strict and controlled driving cycle under very specific atmosphere and temperature. I will never forget the consumer reports person I saw on TV one time saying that BMWs should get lower ratings on the EPA because "if you drive them like you can drive them, then they get signifcantly lower ratings". This creates a certain weakness as EPA testing cycles can drive or affect efficieny technology. For instance, the current EPA cycles do not involve significant idle times... which reduces the incentive to add Start/Stop feature as it will not appear in the EPA cycles.

A good rule of thumb. Take your EURO combined cycle result and multiple by 60% and 70%. The US combined cycle result will fall within those boundaries regardless of pre/post 2008 rating.


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