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  (Source: ubergizmo.com)
Toshiba follows in Nintendo's footsteps in placing a warning on 3D products

Toshiba is issuing a warning for its glasses-free 3D television about the potential harmful effects of 3D images on young children's eyes as part of an electronics industry consortium's recommendations.

Toshiba's warning closely follows Nintendo's same warning, which increased concerns regarding the possible negative effects of 3D images on children's eyesight. Toshiba made mention of the warning in a press release for its presentation at the Consumer Electronics Show, which runs this week from January 6-9.  

After releasing 12-inch and 20-inch versions of the glasses-free 3D television in December, the Japanese company plans to present 56-inch and 65-inch prototypes of its glasses-free 3D television at the Consumer Electronics Show. In the press release for this demonstration, Toshiba said, "due to the possibility of impact on vision development, viewers of 3D video images should be aged 6 or older."

Toshiba made the decision to place the warning on its products due to an electronics industry group's recommendations for 3D technology. Yuji Motomura, chief specialist in Toshiba's TV marketing department, has not released the industry group's name, but said the company has provided research about eyesight health in regards to 3D technology. The recommendation is based on whether glasses are used or not for the 3D experience.  

Despite the new warning, Motomura believes Toshiba will not see any negative consequences regarding the sales of the glasses-free 3D television. In fact, the company plans to launch a glasses-free 3D model that is over 40 inches in the fiscal year to March 2012. Specifics on what date, size or price have not been set yet, but Toshiba did note that it would offer a screen capable of displaying 2D images at "a resolution four times the quality of today's high-definition televisions." 



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RE: Great
By Uncle on 1/5/2011 10:03:42 PM , Rating: 2
You would have had it 10 years sooner if it wasn't for The Great Wall of America keeping the Japanese tech out. It seemed at the time America wanted their own proprietary technology for HD content. If I remember correctly It was a battle between Motorola and some other outfit. It was all about control of the HD market. Look around at all the adverts for HD tvs, HD video cards, etc,etc. When it comes to control of the media, visual and sound and recently ebooks, you aint seen nothin yet.


RE: Great
By Dorkyman on 1/6/2011 6:00:51 PM , Rating: 2
I was deep in it as one of the developers of a delivery protocol that didn't make it.

At the time (1986) NHK was king of the hill in HDTV technology. The Japanese were threatening to take over the entire worldwide television industry. North American Philips and Sarnoff Labs threw down every possible delaying tactic on the tracks they could, including successful demands to change from 1035 active scan lines to the now-standard 1080, and an aspect ratio change from 5:3 (or 15:9) to the now-standard 16:9.

But what did in the Japanese was General Instrument in San Diego, who proposed delivering HD via a revolutionary new compression method called "MPEG2." And that's what was eventually adopted.


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