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China controls 97 percent of the world's rare earth metals. It is cutting its exports to increase profits and stockpile resources.  (Source: Sun Bin)

Sony says that the cuts may eventually force it to raise the price of its electronics. Other Korean and Japanese electronics giants have made similar statements.  (Source: Mynjayz)

EVs like the Chevy Volt, and hybrid vehicles might also see price increases and shortages as China cuts off rare earth exports.  (Source: Car Buyers Notebook)

The shortages will also hurt the wind and solar power industries, which depend heavily on the rare earth metals.  (Source: Wind Power)
Meanwhile nation pockets big profits and builds up its own growing economic juggernaut





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RE: And yet
By simsony on 1/1/2011 12:25:30 AM , Rating: 2
You seem to be thinking that cleaning up pollution from an industrial accident is like vacuuming a house. You obviously don't live near the Gulf states.
What if an industrial accident occurred that released say hydrofluoric acid into the air, and then it rains across the US by getting into the weather system? Who'll clean that up? Who'd fix those permanent burns scars on your family's skin?The company couldn't afford it and would just declare bankruptcy. Whose fault would it be then? And who would pay? Something tells me you'd blame the government for that too.

I think you are either naive or arrogant to think that ANY environmental damage is easily corrected by a simple "cleanup" operation that some corporate will and can pay for.


RE: And yet
By SPOOFE on 1/1/2011 3:08:35 AM , Rating: 2
Conversely, why is the eighth largest economy in the world tanking, bringing down the lives and wellbeing of tens of millions or people? Over-regulation.

Smart, intelligent regulations would avoid all the failings that you note without driving away business, costing careers, harming collected tax revenue, etc. Once you see those symptoms, you know you have too much regulation and it's time to rethink.

Unfortunately, chicken littles like you are hampering our ability to replace outdated and stupid regs with something a little less wasteful. Hope you sleep well at night.


RE: And yet
By simsony on 1/1/2011 6:15:47 PM , Rating: 2
It's very easy to simply call for "smarter regulation", but it is not the same as less/ no regulation. You're coupling the two, which just makes it rhetoric.

You still haven't answered the crux of my argument, who pays the price for missing regulation?

No one in their right mind would argue that smarter regulation isn't better!


RE: And yet
By SPOOFE on 1/1/2011 9:39:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's very easy to simply call for "smarter regulation", but it is not the same as less/ no regulation. You're coupling the two, which just makes it rhetoric.

Reading comprehension FTL. I'm specifically DE-coupling the two. It is you that has conflated criticism for some regulations as criticism of all regulation, and indeed, the very concept of regulation itself.

quote:
You still haven't answered the crux of my argument, who pays the price for missing regulation?

Potentially nobody. Potentially somebody. I DO know that over-regulation DEFINITELY hurts everybody.

quote:
No one in their right mind would argue that smarter regulation isn't better!

Nobody in their right mind CAN argue that smarter regulation is better, because of a slew of hypersensitive status quo defenders that send out a call to arms anytime someone suggests that a given government regulation may not be all that hot.


RE: And yet
By simsony on 1/2/2011 1:28:31 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Potentially nobody. Potentially somebody. I DO know that over-regulation DEFINITELY hurts everybody.
quote:


And missing regulation also DEFINITELY hurts. The banks are a good example.

You remind me of 19th century businessmen who sold people radioactive toothpaste.

You're ignoring the consequences of a mishap, saying "bad things happen", and yet do not have an answer for how to deal with the undesirable consequences, should they happen.

I suppose you'd just call it "collateral damage", but hey we made a million bucks in profit, so it's all good! We need cheap TVs!


RE: And yet
By SPOOFE on 1/2/2011 8:21:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And missing regulation also DEFINITELY hurts. The banks are a good example.

The banks are a TERRIBLE example: They are heavily regulated! They just had BAD regulations that allowed - in fact, pretty much required - that they engage in dangerous financial behavior. Regulations were put into place that favored risky loans. Those were bad, stupid, dumb regulations, and right now, they're the sort of regulations people envision when the call goes out for "more regulation".

A smart system doesn't need a lot of regulation. Just piling more regs on top of broken, lousy, financially disasterous regulations doesn't "fix" anything, it simply makes an awkward, clumsy, directionless, and inaccessible system even worse. Calling for more regulation is just jingoistic crap; obviously we can get LOADS more regulation and it can all be just as bad or worse as existing broken regs. It is the mindless demand for government oversight that is the problem, as opposed to very focused demand for VERY SPECIFIC government oversights.

Unfortunately, the political climate makes the right oversights difficult to implement. For over a decade, people that can't afford a house have been told that they deserve a house. Try telling them otherwise now. That is one of the most insidious problems with government handouts: Once enacted, it's nigh impossible to get rid of, even if it's a tragic failure.


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