backtop


Print 48 comment(s) - last by The Raven.. on Dec 23 at 10:02 AM


The WP7 marketplace ramp-up compared to the iPhone app store (red line).  (Source: WP7Applist.com)
Nokia and Microsoft have had discussions about possible WP7-based Nokia device

In his weekly op-ed, mobile godhead Eldar Murtazin announced that Nokia has been in talks with Microsoft to possibly develop a device based on the Windows Phone 7 operating system.

"This two way dialogue was initiated by new Nokia management," Murtazin writes. "It's a desperate measure for both companies. This is their only solution to stop an all conquering Android."

Nokia's tribulations have been well-documented here on DT [1] [2] [3]. And while Nokia has not commented on the alleged discussions with Microsoft, it seems particularly plausible considering Nokia's new CEO is a former Microsoft exec.

A Windows Phone-based device must sound even more enticing to Nokia, amid reports that the Windows Phone marketplace is ramping up faster than Android did after first launching, and is holding its own against even the Apple store.

"The Windows Phone 7 Marketplace reaching 4,000 apps two months after launch has to be one of the most rapid ramp-ups in recent times, reaching this milestone faster than Android, which took from October 2008 to March 2009 to reach about the same level," Al Hilwa, an analyst with research firm IDC, wrote in a research note.

"We can say that for a company that just a few months ago was an also-ran in mobile, having 10 smartphones released in 30 countries is not a trivial achievement," Hilwa wrote. "I would not be surprised if Microsoft had the third largest app portfolio in the industry by the middle of next year."

With so many reviews and news reports writing off Windows Phone because of a lack of apps, the analysis is encouraging for Microsoft. And even if sales U.S. sales figures can't match that of the iPhone, international reports say WP7 is selling well in Europe and Asia, according to EWeek. But Microsoft is also in a position that allows itself to lose money on a product initially, if adoption is slow. 

"No one expected WP7 to take the market by a storm, but the role of the first release was to [put] Microsoft in the game. To be clear this is a long term battle that will be pivotal for Microsoft’s long-term relevance," Hilwa wrote.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Microsoft taking over in 2 years?
By Mitch101 on 12/21/2010 9:09:08 AM , Rating: 3
Nobody needs 200,000 apps either they need maybe 50-100 good ones and most of those will be games anyhow. With over 4,000 for me the gap is close to being done after all anyone with a good idea is copied a thousand times over shortly after and soon to all platforms.

Soon the phone will be on Verizon and Soon it will allow Cut & Paste, and multitasking for third party apps. After that the list of differences among smartphones begins to run out.

Throw in Microsoft's X-Box 360, Windows Media Center, and Microsoft Office integration with Exchange/Sharepoint and now Droid and iPhone start looking like third party phones with limited functionality.

None are bad phones providing you know the limitations of each and are ok with them but Microsoft is going to become a major player in the phone market again. In the end Blackberry is looking at a rogue wave and when it hits its not going to be pretty for rim.




RE: Microsoft taking over in 2 years?
By KoolAidMan1 on 12/21/2010 2:25:53 PM , Rating: 2
With breadth comes depth. You honestly want a large number of developers aiming towards a single platform, if only because it increases the odds of a high quality developer entering that specific app ecosystem. It obviously increases the amount of poor applications, but that doesn't automatically mean that there is a point when high quality applications stop coming through.

Sure, I don't need 200k apps, but if you have that many people working on a platform then you are bound to have more apps and more specialized apps compared to the other. The augmented reality stuff I'm seeing on iOS currently exceeds what I'm seeing on other platforms, and there is no question that productivity and gaming is much better on iOS than on other platforms. Those will all catch up as Android and WM7 get more developers on board.

So yeah, a limited number of apps isn't a virtue. :)


By Mitch101 on 12/22/2010 9:00:29 AM , Rating: 2
I think its one of those things like Gaming consoles.

You get some exclusives but since all 3 consoles sold millions you get most companies that produce their product for all three of them. Sure one console has a slight advantage over another but overall its the same app/game.

Microsoft's goal would be to get enough market base so programmers write their apps for Mobile 7 as well as the current leaders Droid and iPhone. Then its up to Microsoft to offer the exclusive items that Apple and Droid cant deliver. (X-Box, Exchange, Sharepoint, Office, Media Center, etc) This is how I believe Microsoft Mobile 7 will eventually beat out the Droid and iPhone.

I think I was finally able to summarize why Windows Phone 7 will eventually be superior.


"Let's face it, we're not changing the world. We're building a product that helps people buy more crap - and watch porn." -- Seagate CEO Bill Watkins














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki