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Chevy Volt
130 Chevrolet Volts are going to select U.S. markets; first production model up for auction

The Chevrolet Volt represents one of the most important launches of General Motors' long history. The vehicle represents an important milestone bridging the past (internal combustion engines) and our eventual future (electric propulsion) when it comes to automotive transportation, and has already nabbed "Car of the Year" awards from Automobile and Motor Trend.

GM has announced that the Volt is now shipping to dealerships in select parts of the country – California, New York, Texas, Washington, D.C. – albeit in limited numbers. GM is only expecting to deliver 160 vehicles this week.

"Today is a historic milestone for Chevrolet," remarked Tony DiSalle, Volt marketing director. "We have redefined automotive transportation with the Volt, and soon the first customers will be able to experience gas-free commuting with the freedom to take an extended trip whenever or wherever they want."

In addition to Volts that are heading to dealerships, the very first Volt to roll off the assembly line is currently up for auction. Proceeds from the sale of the vehicle will go to the Detroit Public Schools Foundation -- at this moment, the high bid for the vehicle is a whopping $185,000. The auction ends later today.

The Chevy Volt is powered by 149hp (273 lb-ft torque) electric motor which provides 35 miles of fossil fuel-free driving courtesy of its 16 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. A 1.4-liter gasoline engine kicks in at the point to recharge the battery pack and provide additional power to the front wheels (under certain circumstances). The Volt has a maximum driving range of 375 miles.

When it comes to pricing, the Volt won't come cheap. It is priced at $41,000 before a $7,500 federal tax credit.



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RE: Echo
By mindless1 on 12/16/2010 4:10:19 AM , Rating: 2
... or it could be literary style, that you repeat words to drive home an idea, that you are restating essentially the same thing for those who didn't get it the first time.

However, you should not have been taught what you claim in English class because it is not improper English to do so... and it's very rude and antisocial to nitpick what someone else writes to this extend, similar to if someone criticizes you in public for the way you walk, talk, part your hair, etc.

Take a break and get out around real people, m'k?


RE: Echo
By adiposity on 12/16/2010 6:04:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
However, you should not have been taught what you claim in English class because it is not improper English to do so


No, it is not (by the way, it was not a hard and fast rule, but just a suggestion for improving one's style). But, in English class, they do teach more than just grammar. They teach writing, for one. Part of writing is learning to express your ideas in effective ways.

Now, it may indeed be a "style" to repeat yourself, hoping that people will get the point. But this brings up another point, that you can repeat an idea without using the same vocabulary. This has the added advantage of giving the reader two ways to absorb the idea, in case one doesn't stick.

When writing myself, I notice that I sometimes have the tendency of reusing words I recently used or read. It's not deliberate, but just occurs because those words are present in my mind. By being aware of this, you can use other words and write something that is less jarring to the reader (avoiding the sensation of "didn't I just read this sentence?").

Anyway, thank you for your input. I still feel the lesson I learned in my 7th grade English class has some merit. Varying usage does produce a more readable result.


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