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Print 105 comment(s) - last by iiiears.. on Dec 12 at 3:08 PM


Wikileaks has lost its domain name and is now only reachable by direct IP. It has lost virtually all its primary sources of funding.

An hacker activist has helped make Wikileaks difficult to reach, even before the recent domain name takedown.  (Source: Vimeo)

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested in England on supposedly unrelated charges.  (Source: AP Photo)
Site's options continue to shrink

Wikileaks aired hundreds of thousands of classified documents on the Iraq and Afghanistan wars that were stolen from the U.S Military, and shared 250,000 stolen classified U.S. State Department cables with The New York Times and other news organizations worldwide. The website certainly irritated the governments of U.S., China, Britain and many other organizations worldwide.  They moved to cut off the site's funding, first convincing Amazon to throw it off its hosting platform, then working with Paypal to sever its primary source of funding.  

But when 
Wikileaks yesterday published a list of top targets to hurt U.S. national security, the site seemingly sealed its own fate.  Its Swiss bank account was closed, and Wikileaks reportedly lost the money in it (the bank contended that Wikileaks founder Julian Assange lied in the paperwork, saying he resided in Switzerland, which he does not).

Now the DNS Company, the web listing organization which provided 
Wikileaks with the right to use the domain name "wikileaks.org", has terminated its affiliation with the site.  That means that attempts to reach the site by domain name no longer succeed.

The site also lost another hosting service -- EveryDNS.net -- and has jumped to a mix of Swiss and French hosting at the present.  But France's government is already moving to ban the site from its nations servers.

Meanwhile the site is under a distributed denial of service attack from a "hacktivist" who goes by the moniker The Jester – or "th3 j35t3r".  On his Twitter feed, The Jester writes, "TANGO DOWN - for attempting to endanger the lives of our troops, 'other assets' & foreign relations."

An earlier attack exceeded a modest 2-4 Gbps, but a Tuesday attack was even more potent, reaching a mean 10 Gbps.

About the only way to get to Wikileaks these days is via a Google search, which comes up with its direct IP address, which is occasionally reachable, depending on the current volume of fake service requests.

Facing the possibility of his masterwork being taken offline and complete loss of funding,
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange surrendered to authorities in Britain on Swedish rape charges unrelated to the recent leaks.  He has warned his followers that if anything happens to him while he is imprisoned, that a secret key will be released which will unlock a distributed archived file containing all the site's unreleased secrets.

One of Mr. Assange's accusers in the Swedish sex crimes trial coincidentally has ties to the CIA.  Mr. Assange was denied bail, as he is to be extradited to Sweden for questioning on outstanding allegations of rape, molestation and unlawful coercion.  When asked if he understood the ruling, he commented, "I understand that and I do not consent."

Apparently the matter was not left up to his determination.



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RE: Wiki
By Chaser on 12/7/2010 11:19:26 AM , Rating: 2
They are now cannon fodder. Their online acessibility, finances, revenue streams, almost complete support infastructure and their fearless patriot leader is on ice. Their big statement is going to be a unnoticable, insignificant whisper now.

au revoir.


RE: Wiki
By 91TTZ on 12/7/2010 11:38:04 AM , Rating: 2
False.

Their only claim to fame was their ability to release information. They're still able to do that. The cat is out of the bag, and that information will no longer be secure.

They have already succeeded at what they wanted to do. The spread of that leaked information can no longer be stopped.


RE: Wiki
By Solandri on 12/7/2010 2:45:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
They have already succeeded at what they wanted to do. The spread of that leaked information can no longer be stopped.

That's not the OP's point. The spread of that leaked (past tense) info can no longer be stopped. But if their operations get shut down, the spread of future leaked info has been stopped, at least through them.

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. OP's point is that it looks like Wikileaks' impact on geopolitics will be of the "for a day" kind.


RE: Wiki
By xkrakenx on 12/7/2010 11:40:00 AM , Rating: 2
journalists who remember the serious leaking of relevant docs in the 70s thumb their nose at this twit and his attention getting org.

to call assuange a hero is an embarrassment to people who do actually work to fight tyranny.


RE: Wiki
By mcnabney on 12/7/2010 12:19:23 PM , Rating: 4
Dead on.

The Pentagon Papers were direct refutations of lies being actively pandered to the American public. Exposing those politically motivated lies was an act of whistleblowing.

To tell you the truth, releasing Colateral Murder was fine. It was a documentation of what really happened and was glossed-over at the time.

But the massive leak of diplomatic documents and battle reports from Afghanistan weren't acts of whistleblowing. They were straight out spying. And the 'target list' is pretty much tantamount to supporting terrorism. Informing the world, and hostile agents, of infrastructure weaknesses has nothing to do with exposing corruption. It is arming the terrorists with intelligence.

I think everyone involved should be tried as spies (not treason, treason is for Americans). Unlike the recently uncovered Russian spy-ring (almost completely unsuccessful), nobody is going to trade to get them back...


RE: Wiki
By iiiears on 12/12/2010 3:08:49 PM , Rating: 2
If you are right I think they will charge him with murder. also the NY Times, The Guardian, and many others. In essence what they have done so far is convict him in public without a trial AND denied him the resources to defend himself.

I am very sorry to see the destruction of a very useful wiki and the U.S. government decide to redefine the word Freedom.

Hillary Clinton "Internet Freedom"
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/01/21/i...

"On their own, new technologies do not take sides in the struggle for freedom and progress. But the United States does. We stand for a single internet where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas. And we recognize that the world's information infrastructure will become what we and others make of it.

This challenge may be new, but our responsibility to help ensure the free exchange of ideas goes back to the birth of our republic. The words of the First Amendment to the Constitution are carved in 50 tons of Tennessee marble on the front of this building. And every generation of Americans has worked to protect the values etched in that stone.

Franklin Roosevelt built on these ideas when he delivered his Four Freedoms speech in 1941. At the time, Americans faced a cavalcade of crises and a crisis of confidence. But the vision of a world in which all people enjoyed freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear transcended the trouble of his day. "

It seems more likely to me that those in charge DO value freedom and will come to understand and respect Julian Assange for his actions - though never forget the discomfort it has brought them. It seems likely to me that this issue too shall fade and wikileaks will be restored and revered. If the nobel prize is worth it's title he will be given one.


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