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Now if we can just get Congress to ban annoying commercials...
Obama is expected to sign bill into law

One of the things that many people hate the most about commercials on TV is that the volume of those commercials is often much higher than the volume of the show being watched. That means that TV watchers end up having to have the remote in hands to adjust the volume constantly and depending on the show and the number of commercials that constant adjustment can quickly get annoying.

Congress has passed a new act that is headed to Obama's desk called the CALM Act that will force commercial makers to regulate the volume of their commercials so that the commercials are no louder than the accompanying programming. President Obama is expected to sign the bill into law. CALM stands for Commercial Advertising Loudness Mitigation. The act has been in the works for a while and was approved by the House and Senate this week clearing the way for Obama to sign it into law.

The
Wall Street Journal quotes Rep. Anna Eshoo, the sponsor of the House bill, saying, "Consumers have been asking for a solution to this problem for decades, and today they finally have it. [The bill] gives consumers peace of mind, because it puts them in control of the sound in their homes."

The FCC has received complaints about the volume of ads for years and has historically told users to simply mute the volume. Eshoo said, "Consumers will no longer have to experience being blasted at. It’s a simple fix to a huge nuisance."

The sponsor of the Senate bill was Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse. Whitehouse stated, "While this is far from the biggest issue we face, it will mean one less daily annoyance in our lives."



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Compression
By Aikouka on 12/3/2010 11:23:42 AM , Rating: 2
I thought I recalled hearing that the loudness of things was typically caused by compression? So I guess this bill would limit the use of it.

I tried to find something to corroborate this and I found...

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range_compres...
quote:
As was alluded to above, the use of compressors to boost perceived volume is a favorite trick of broadcasters who want their station to sound "louder" at the same volume than comparable stations on the dial. The effect is to make the more heavily compressed station "jump out" at the listener at a given volume setting.

But loudness jumps are not limited to inter-channel differences; they also exist between programme material within the same channel. Loudness differences are a frequent source of audience complaints, especially TV Commercials and Promos which are known to be 'too loud'. One complicating factor is that many broadcasters use (quasi-)peak meters and peak-levelling. Unfortunately the peak level reading does not correlate very well with the perceived loudness. It basically should only be used to prevent overmodulation.




RE: Compression
By dlmartin53 on 12/3/10, Rating: 0
"We basically took a look at this situation and said, this is bullshit." -- Newegg Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng's take on patent troll Soverain











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