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  (Source: pernille.typepad.com)
Using antibacterial soaps with triclosan excessively can cause immune system problems in those under 18

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered that an overexposure to triclosan in young people and an overexposure to Bisphenol A in adults can have negative health effects on the human body. 

Allison Aiello, study leader and associate professor at the U-M School of Public Health, along with Erin Rees Clayton, co-author of the study at the U-M School of Public Health, have found that triclosan, which is found in antibacterial soaps, may cause allergies in young people while Bisphenol A, which is found in most plastics, can harm the adult immune system. 

Previous research associated with triclosan and Bisphenol A has been conducted on animal models, but this is the first study to show how both toxicants influence human function. 

Triclosan and Bisphenol A belong in a class of environmental toxicants called endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) and can imitate or affect hormones causing negative health risks in humans. Bisphenol A can be found in plastics and protective linings in food cans, and triclosan can be found in antibacterial soaps, medical devices, toothpastes, pens and diaper bags. 

The U-M researchers came to the conclusion that both triclosan and Bisphenol A can negatively affect the human body by utilizing data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Aiello and Rees Clayton compared cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody levels and diagnosis of allergies/hay fever with urinary Bisphenol A and triclosan in a sample that consisted of U.S. adults and children over the age of six. 

The results showed that people over the age of 18 with higher levels of Bisphenol A had increased CMV antibody levels. Rees Clayton said that this indicates that the person's "cell-mediated immune system" may not be working correctly. 

In addition, Aiello and Rees Clayton found that those under the age of 18 with high levels of triclosan had an increased risk of developing allergies or hay fever. 

"The triclosan findings in the younger age groups may support the 'hygiene hypothesis,' which maintains living in very clean and hygienic environments may impact our exposure to micro-organisms that are beneficial for development of the immune system," said Aiello.

Aiello also noted that people can be too clean. Using an excessive amount of antibacterial soaps with triclosan during childhood can change the way our immune systems develop by altering the micro-organisms we're normally exposed to. 

Another finding showed that Bisphenol A exposure depends on age. Those over 18 who had higher Bisphenol A levels also had high CMV levels, but for those under 18, the opposite occurred. Researchers believe this means that the timing, quantity and length of exposure determines how the immune system is influenced by Bisphenol A. 

The only issue with this study is that it measured exposure and disease at the same time, which shows only part of the overall picture. 

"It is possible, for example, that individuals who have an allergy are more hygienic because of their condition, and that the relationship we observed is, therefore, not casual or is an example of reverse causation," said Aiello. 

The U-M researchers hope to use this study to continue learning the long-term effects of triclosan and Bisphenol A in humans to see if they can develop a "causal relationship." 



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RE: Just what I've been saying
By foolsgambit11 on 11/30/2010 4:52:16 PM , Rating: 2
I feel like more and more gets lumped under 'microevolution' as we find evidence of evolution occurring. It's like artificial intelligence research - it's a moving target. It used to be, if we could create a machine that could beat the best chess players in the world, that would be AI. Once that was done, we discovered that wasn't actually AI. We could probably create a machine that would pass the Turing Test now, but we already know it wouldn't really be AI, just clever programming.

The same thing happens with evolution. It used to be, if we saw an actual new species develop, that was evolution. But once we saw it, wait, no, that wasn't evolution, that was still just microevolution. At least now, we're probably close to the point where we can see that those who still aren't convinced won't be convinced by any evidence collectible within their lifetimes. Unless we develop time-travel technology.

If we want to debate the original origins of life, science only has a 'best guess' right now, without any real evidence save feasibility going for it (and the circumstantial evidence of the fossil record beginning with very simple organisms). But when it comes to the origin of the species that exist today, evolution is certainly the most logical, most coherent, most explanatory, and best documented explanation available to us.


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