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  (Source: pernille.typepad.com)
Using antibacterial soaps with triclosan excessively can cause immune system problems in those under 18

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered that an overexposure to triclosan in young people and an overexposure to Bisphenol A in adults can have negative health effects on the human body. 

Allison Aiello, study leader and associate professor at the U-M School of Public Health, along with Erin Rees Clayton, co-author of the study at the U-M School of Public Health, have found that triclosan, which is found in antibacterial soaps, may cause allergies in young people while Bisphenol A, which is found in most plastics, can harm the adult immune system. 

Previous research associated with triclosan and Bisphenol A has been conducted on animal models, but this is the first study to show how both toxicants influence human function. 

Triclosan and Bisphenol A belong in a class of environmental toxicants called endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) and can imitate or affect hormones causing negative health risks in humans. Bisphenol A can be found in plastics and protective linings in food cans, and triclosan can be found in antibacterial soaps, medical devices, toothpastes, pens and diaper bags. 

The U-M researchers came to the conclusion that both triclosan and Bisphenol A can negatively affect the human body by utilizing data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Aiello and Rees Clayton compared cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody levels and diagnosis of allergies/hay fever with urinary Bisphenol A and triclosan in a sample that consisted of U.S. adults and children over the age of six. 

The results showed that people over the age of 18 with higher levels of Bisphenol A had increased CMV antibody levels. Rees Clayton said that this indicates that the person's "cell-mediated immune system" may not be working correctly. 

In addition, Aiello and Rees Clayton found that those under the age of 18 with high levels of triclosan had an increased risk of developing allergies or hay fever. 

"The triclosan findings in the younger age groups may support the 'hygiene hypothesis,' which maintains living in very clean and hygienic environments may impact our exposure to micro-organisms that are beneficial for development of the immune system," said Aiello.

Aiello also noted that people can be too clean. Using an excessive amount of antibacterial soaps with triclosan during childhood can change the way our immune systems develop by altering the micro-organisms we're normally exposed to. 

Another finding showed that Bisphenol A exposure depends on age. Those over 18 who had higher Bisphenol A levels also had high CMV levels, but for those under 18, the opposite occurred. Researchers believe this means that the timing, quantity and length of exposure determines how the immune system is influenced by Bisphenol A. 

The only issue with this study is that it measured exposure and disease at the same time, which shows only part of the overall picture. 

"It is possible, for example, that individuals who have an allergy are more hygienic because of their condition, and that the relationship we observed is, therefore, not casual or is an example of reverse causation," said Aiello. 

The U-M researchers hope to use this study to continue learning the long-term effects of triclosan and Bisphenol A in humans to see if they can develop a "causal relationship." 



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RE: Just what I've been saying
By Gio6518 on 11/29/2010 5:27:30 PM , Rating: 5
Since viruses contain both RNA and DNA they are completely able to mutate.
Bacterial antibiotic resistance or viral antiviral drug resistance are often cited to prove the alleged creative power of evolution through mutation and selection. While antibiotic resistance and antiviral drug resistance are very real phenomena, they have no real bearing on the actual ability of evolutionary processes to create new genetic information, and do not give real clues as to the origin of species in the first place. Antibiotic resistance and antiviral drug resistance are excellent examples of microevolution, or minor change within population, and involve the origination of zero to miniscule amounts of information in the genome.

quote:
Vaccinations against viruses: Vaccines can be successful against viruses. There are successful vaccines against many viruses including smallpox, chicken pox, measles, mumps, rubella, and others. The body's immune system kills viruses by actually killing the whole cell that is virus infected. Virus vaccines teach the body's immune system how to recognize specific virus-infected cells. Unfortunately, some viruses are difficult to create vaccines against, because they mutate, and the body cannot easily recognize the newly mutated form. Vaccination against the flu is only partially helpful because there are so many strains of the flu. Flu viruses mutate very often, which explains why a new flu vaccine is needed each year. The HIV virus is also particularly good at mutating itself, and has defied attempts to create a HIV vaccine as yet. Similarly, vaccines against the most common viruses, such as the common cold, remain elusive.


http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/disease/viruses.htm


RE: Just what I've been saying
By PCR on 11/29/2010 6:46:44 PM , Rating: 2
You are correct. I was only referring to antibiotics. The presence or absence of antibiotics has no bearing on the mutation of viruses. Antibiotics only affect bacteria, that's the point I was trying to make. Since Triclosan is not an antiviral it does not select for antiviral resistant viruses.

quote:
Since viruses contain both RNA and DNA they are completely able to mutate.

Not all viruses contain both RNA and DNA, some are RNA only viruses and others are DNA viruses.

quote:
The body's immune system kills viruses by actually killing the whole cell that is virus infected.

That is misleading and somewhat simplistic, yes the immune system does do that through an interferon mediated response, however viruses are also inactivated by antibodies without actually killing the infected cell.

RNA viruses mutate more readily compared to DNA viruses, thus creating the problem of an affective vaccine, e.g. HIV, Flu, however antibiotics do not cause their mutation! This has more to do with the nature of RNA polymerase (viral replication) and the lability of RNA itself.


RE: Just what I've been saying
By Gio6518 on 11/29/2010 7:18:45 PM , Rating: 2
Very true.
I was just using simplistic terms and examples, like my reference to MRSA. Wasn't expecting someone to take it so literally. All living things go through some kind of natural selection, if they didn't they wouldn't exist.

quote:
however antibiotics do not cause their mutation!

It would be more of an antiviral agent than an antibiotic, even though not always the case. I was just trying to keep it simple.


RE: Just what I've been saying
By Jyrioffinland on 11/30/2010 5:47:53 AM , Rating: 2
I was wondering how long it takes before we get to 'discuss' ID... ;)

quote:
While antibiotic resistance and antiviral drug resistance are very real phenomena, they have no real bearing on the actual ability of evolutionary processes to create new genetic information [...] Antibiotic resistance and antiviral drug resistance are excellent examples of microevolution...


I can't think how you could contradict yourself any more. LOL

Evolution = Cumulative sum of 'micro evolution' (sic) over a very long period of time.


RE: Just what I've been saying
By foolsgambit11 on 11/30/2010 4:52:16 PM , Rating: 2
I feel like more and more gets lumped under 'microevolution' as we find evidence of evolution occurring. It's like artificial intelligence research - it's a moving target. It used to be, if we could create a machine that could beat the best chess players in the world, that would be AI. Once that was done, we discovered that wasn't actually AI. We could probably create a machine that would pass the Turing Test now, but we already know it wouldn't really be AI, just clever programming.

The same thing happens with evolution. It used to be, if we saw an actual new species develop, that was evolution. But once we saw it, wait, no, that wasn't evolution, that was still just microevolution. At least now, we're probably close to the point where we can see that those who still aren't convinced won't be convinced by any evidence collectible within their lifetimes. Unless we develop time-travel technology.

If we want to debate the original origins of life, science only has a 'best guess' right now, without any real evidence save feasibility going for it (and the circumstantial evidence of the fossil record beginning with very simple organisms). But when it comes to the origin of the species that exist today, evolution is certainly the most logical, most coherent, most explanatory, and best documented explanation available to us.


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