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Chevrolet Volt window sticker
93 mpg on battery power, 37 mpg on gasoline power

After a cluster bomb that was unleashed yesterday when the Nissan Leaf was rated for an EPA estimated 99 mpg -- even though it is a "battery only" vehicle -- General Motors is dropping a bunch of digits on us when it comes to the EPA rating for its Chevrolet Volt.

According to the window sticker that will be plastered on all new Volts sold in the U.S., the vehicle is rate at an equivalent of 93 mpg when running on electricity, and a more sedate 37 mpg when the gasoline engine kicks in after the battery is depleted. This two figures combined give the Volt a "composite" rating of 60 mpg.

And here are some more numbers -- the Volt will have an official "battery only" range of 35 miles, while the total driving range (taking into account the batteries and the gasoline tank) will be 379 miles.

When the Volt was first announced, GM said that the vehicle would have a 40-mile range when running on battery power. The company recently revised that figure to 25-50 miles.

The Volt will go on sale later this month with a price tag of $41,000 before a $7,500 federal tax credit.



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RE: They need to stop playing the funny numbers game.
By mliska1 on 11/24/2010 5:07:17 PM , Rating: 2
But they're also ignoring all of the inefficencies in getting the crude oil out of the ground, refining it (that uses a huge amount of heat to do), pumping it by pipe to substations, hauling it one tanker truck at a time to gas stations in extremely inefficient trucks, pumping it into your car, etc. If you include that, recharging your electric car is probably more efficent than gassing up.


RE: They need to stop playing the funny numbers game.
By 91TTZ on 11/24/2010 5:17:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But they're also ignoring all of the inefficencies in getting the crude oil out of the ground, refining it (that uses a huge amount of heat to do), pumping it by pipe to substations, hauling it one tanker truck at a time to gas stations in extremely inefficient trucks, pumping it into your car, etc. If you include that, recharging your electric car is probably more efficent than gassing up.


But the rating system is based on the fuel economy of gasoline, which has already been refined and transported, so those factors never come into play. The starting point of the comparison is the gallon of gasoline sitting in your fuel tank.


By Alexstarfire on 11/25/2010 2:55:08 AM , Rating: 2
So you'd ignore the inefficiency of producing the gas but not for electric and call it fair? Sorry, that isn't going to fly. If they are using the gas in the gas tank as a starting point then using the amount of electricity in the battery is the exact same comparison.


By Targon on 11/26/2010 6:02:18 AM , Rating: 2
How efficient something is only applies to where the consumer has to pay. In this case, you have the electricity the consumer pays for to the amount that ends up in the battery.

The (in)efficiency of the power plant and distribution is already included in the cost of electricity, in the way that the cost of gas already includes the cost of crude oil, processing, and distribution of the resulting gasoline to your local gas station.

The point that the number of kilowatts of electricity you get and pay for from the electric company will be higher than the amount the battery will absorb is the percentage lost in the charging process of the battery pack.

So, you pay for your gas, and you pay for your electric. How much power is lost in the process of charging up a plug-in car?


RE: They need to stop playing the funny numbers game.
By mliska1 on 11/24/2010 5:48:22 PM , Rating: 3
I stand by my retarded thinking. The original poster said that, in an ICE that it takes into account inherant losses through combustion which, of course, are way, way more than the losses of simply putting power in a battery through an electric motor for forward motion. However, he wants to counter that by adding effects of making the power itself through coal combustion and the losses in transmission. These are not the same thing.

If you're going to count only losses in the car's power plant, then you have to count it the way it was measured: using the regular MPG rating of a gas engine to its equivalent in electric power. If you're going to add losses far outside the car itself, such as losses from coal combustion and electric transmission, then you have to add the losses of gasoline refining and transportation as well.


By Reclaimer77 on 11/24/2010 6:47:57 PM , Rating: 1
No he's not. I think you need to read his post again.


By Solandri on 11/24/2010 7:04:39 PM , Rating: 3
You can avoid most of this argument by doing a cost-per-gallon comparison.

Current price of 87 octane gas = about $3.00/gal

From the fine print on the EPA label:
$0.12 per kW-hr of electricity
33.7 kW-hr per gallon-equivalent
($0.12 / kW-hr) * (33.7 kW-hr / gallon) = $4.044/gal-equiv

So from the figures the EPA is using, energy in the form of electricity is more expensive than energy in the form of gasoline. And the only reason EVs are cheaper to operate is because they're more efficient from battery pack to wheels on the ground.


By phantom505 on 11/24/2010 10:55:03 PM , Rating: 2
And to make it even more confusing you're best off using local gas and electric prices. But that would require someone to think... and we can't have consumers doing that!


RE: They need to stop playing the funny numbers game.
By goku on 11/25/2010 3:51:52 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
But that would require someone to think... and we can't have consumers doing that!

Well you can't have consumers be doing that, you need them to follow obediently to what the government says you should do. If your government tells you this isn't violating your rights or that this is what you should buy, you're going to have to believe that because otherwise you're against the government. If you're having people think about one thing, they might start thinking about other things, and soon might threaten the power of the government to exert control. It's best to keep people hopelessly ignorant as it's easier to control them that way, whether it's in the dealership show room, or when they're being screened by the TSA.

You're either with us or against us.


By phantom505 on 11/25/2010 1:43:39 PM , Rating: 2
There are many things not right with the politics of this country. Three of them is the idea you can be infinitely intelligent, infinitely paranoid, and infinitely able to control what happens in your life. None of these things are possible unless you're God, so yes, you need a summary and an education to understand the summary.

This sticker provides that but what would make sense is to have the local dealers actually post a little info for you that is fact based) on the actual costs of energy.

Government last I check isn't telling you what car to buy, they are encouraging technological growth and a sustainable route. Using fossil fuels will not work forever. More people means more cars. If we keep relying on imported fossil fuels then we have a national security problem on top of an air and water quality problem, on top of potentially numerous other issues.

I wish people on this site would quit trying to over simplify everything, nothing is that simple. If it were we would have already come up with a perfect solution.


By Alexstarfire on 11/25/2010 6:05:25 AM , Rating: 1
You make it sound like it's a bad thing that EVs have a more efficient motor. That's pretty much the only reason EVs are worth looking at after all. ICEs could barely manage half the efficiency at best that most electric motors have now.


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