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Print 10 comment(s) - last by mikeyD95125.. on Nov 9 at 3:13 AM

Motorola Droid Pro features a QWERTY keyboard

We first brought you news about Motorola's new QWERTY keyboard-equipped Droid Pro back in early October. Today, Motorola has announced that the Droid Pro will be available for pre-order on Verizon for $179.99 (after $100 mail-in rebate) with a qualifying two-year contract starting tomorrow.

Motorola is aiming the Droid Pro at business users; most likely those that have an affinity for RIM's popular Blackberry smartphones. The Android 2.2-based smartphone supports "corporate level security" for its push email, AuthenTec IPSec multi-headed VPN integration, remote wipe, complex password support, unified calendar, and comes with Quickoffice Mobile Suite preinstalled.

“The DROID PRO is an advanced business-ready solution that provides users with the full smartphone experience, redefined by delivering the power of a DROID,” said Sanjay Jha, CEO of Motorola Mobility.

“DROID PRO combines the feature-packed, high-level user experience that customers look for in an Android smartphone plus the security that enterprises require, all with the reliability of Verizon Wireless’ 3G network,” added Mike Lanman, president of Enterprise and Government Markets for Verizon Wireless.

The Droid Pro features a 3.1" display, 5mp camera with dual LED flash, Wi-Fi/DNLA, and 3G Mobile Hotspot capabilities.



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RE: More Androids
By mikeyD95125 on 11/9/2010 3:13:33 AM , Rating: 2
Planned obsolescence is a business practice that allows companies to release incrementally better hardware that will be usurped in a very short amount of time. Instead of taking the time to release a product that will last a long time they can make far more money slowly adding features by phasing in several product models. Many companies(Intel comes to mind) even tell the public want they are going to release several years in advance knowing it will become obsolete in 6 months. While the semi conductor industry is extremely fast moving, it is not all due to technological progress. I'd bet if it wanted to, Intel could have released next year's processors today, but they are going to make a lot more money selling 4 different revisions in between now and then.


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