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Mocks Apple's famous Mac vs. PC ads while claiming 'America's largest 4G network'

Today is a new day for the American people. There's a new wireless 4G contender in town, whether you believe it or not. Yesterday, T-Mobile began running television ads that lambaste the iPhone 4 on AT&T's network and while boasting about its own MyTouch 4G on "America's largest 4G network."

The 30-second spot mocks the famous Apple ads featuring Justin Long ("Hi, I'm a Mac.") and John Hodgeman ("Hi, I'm a PC.") standing in white space, arguing about what they can and can't do. In the T-Mobile spot, a fair-skinned woman, much younger than Catherine Zeta-Jones, wearing a magenta- and white-striped dress introduces herself as a MyTouch 4G and boasts about her ability to video-chat anywhere with T-Mobile's 4G network. Next to her is a a blonde man in a suit who introduces himself as an iPhone 4, except he's struggling to carry an older bald guy on his back. 

"Who's your friend?" MyTouch asks.

"Oh, that's the old AT&T network," iPhone 4 replies.

"That'll slow you down," MyTouch says.

"That's the price I pay for 3G speed," iPhone 4 replies.

"Bummer," says MyTouch.

AT&T has long been touting "the nation's fastest 3G network" tag in its own ads. Thus, the war of words has commenced.

The ad began running last night during NCIS:LA, Dancing with the Stars, The Daily Show, andThe Colbert Report -- AndroidAndMe reports -- in advance of today's MyTouch 4G launch. The new MyTouch is T-Mobile's first "4G"-branded device.

AT&T has never been a fan of T-Mobile claiming 4G speeds. And there has been much debate about what 4G really is, anyway. According to the International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunications (ITU-R), 4G "must have target peak data rates of up to approximately 100 Mbps for high mobility such as mobile access." But only WiMax 2 and LTE-Advanced will be capable of those kinds of speeds, neither of which we can expect to see before 2013. If following that standard, Sprint/Clearwire's burgeoning WiMax network, currently marketed as "4G," truly isn't. The same can be said about both Verizon and AT&T's upcoming LTE networks. The bottom line is that "4G," to the average consumer, is merely a branding mechanism. The "MyTouch HSPA+" just doesn't have the same ring.

Here's howNeville Ray, T-Mobile's chief technology officer, justifies it in a press release

4G is about performance and today T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network is delivering 4G speeds that match and often beat WiMAX and are readily comparable to what early LTE will deliver. Our 4G network is capable of theoretical speeds up to 21Mbps and we have seen average download speeds approaching five Mbps on our myTouch 4G phone in some cities with peak speeds of nearly 12 Mbps. Further, independent reviewers have seen average download speeds on our webConnect Rocket between 5 and 8 Mbps with peak speeds up to 8-10Mbps. The footprint of our 4G service is not something that competitors are going to match anytime soon, and starting today, we will begin marketing our network advantage with TV commercials advertising ‘America’s Largest 4G Network’ from T-Mobile.

"Consumers do not understand the technical alphabet soup of technologies involved in 4G, but for our purposes we define WiMAX, LTE and HSPA+ as 4G technologies," added Chris Nicoll, distinguished research fellow, Yankee Group. “HSPA+ is evolving a far more ambitious and long-term road map than was originally envisioned."

With the addition of six new cities (Chicago, Ill.; Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ft. Wayne, Ind.; Louisville, Ky.; and Raleigh-Durham and Wilmington, N.C.), T-Mobile's HSPA+ services are now available in more than 75 metropolitan areas.

In the past, AT&T unsuccessfully tried to sue Verizon for Big Red's television ads that mockingly boasted,"There's a map for that," and pitted the two coverage maps against each other (Verizon visually being the clear winner). It will be interesting to see how the iPhone's carrier -- or is it vice versa? -- responds.




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RE: T-Mobile is stupid
By blckgrffn on 11/3/2010 2:13:31 PM , Rating: 2
Did you read the article? They all should 3G+ or something until they demonstrate, in the field, speeds that qualify to the technical standard of 4G. According to the article, none have.

What's strange is that the standards board left such a huge gap between 3G (2.4Mbps stationary based on what the internet told me) and 4G (100Mbps+!). What did they ever plan for the in between speeds?


RE: T-Mobile is stupid
By Solandri on 11/4/2010 12:15:29 AM , Rating: 2
Bear in mind that this is an industry which has been getting away for years with selling limited data as unlimited.

"4G" will probably be one of those standards defined by the public's perception, not a standards body. Like how our hard drives are now listed in 1 billion byte GB instead 1024^3 byte GB.


RE: T-Mobile is stupid
By mcnabney on 11/4/2010 9:46:04 AM , Rating: 2
4G is not 100mbs!

Those kind of speeds require a ludicrous amount of spectrum.


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