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Print 32 comment(s) - last by skyyspam.. on Oct 29 at 9:41 PM


1Gbps over DSL copper lines may be in our future
Realistic connectivity with DSL will be in the 390Mbps range

Broadband speeds for internet users in America are often woeful in comparison to the speeds found in other countries around the world. The FCC is working hard to get faster broadband connections all around the country, especially to the poor and those that live in rural areas.

Vendors are also working hard to increase the speed of our web connections using existing methods while other firms work on faster speeds with new technology like fiber optic and wireless connectivity. Today, the majority of fixed-line internet is served by copper cables that have been around for decades.

As various vendors that make the hardware that allows broadband over cable wires using DSL technology make technological breakthroughs, the speeds consumers can get are growing. Nokia Siemens recently announced that it could transmit data at up to 825Mbps using copper wires for a distance of 400 meters. Huawei has also announced that it has been able to transmit data at up to 700Mbps over the same distance.

The fastest speeds in tests have been from Alcatel-Lucent with the ability to send data at 910Mbps over 400 meters. These fast speeds are achieved using different methods. One of the methods reports
PC World is VDSL2 (Very high bit-rate digital subscriber Line) that sends data over several copper pairs at one time. The VDSL2 method also uses DSL Phantom Mode to create a third virtual copper pair to send more data over along with the two copper pairs.

Phantom Mode reportedly causes crosstalk that the vendor then has to eliminate using noise canceling tech very similar to the tech used by noise canceling headphones. The tech monitors noise on the copper pairs continuously and generates its own signal to cancel the noise out. The vendors getting some of the highest speeds are using copper wire with four pairs inside, but that wiring is not readily available making the dual pair approach more realistic. 

Sending data across two copper pairs is good for data speeds up to 390Mbps over 400 meters and vectoring can increase that distance to 1,000 meters. Products using these new techniques are starting field trials with providers now and should be in the commercial space for consumers next year.

Fiber optic web connections are already available at 1Gbps speeds in some areas.



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RE: Who gives a $hit?
By bill4 on 10/28/2010 12:57:46 AM , Rating: 1
Tiny cap? Where do you live?

Most ISP's have no caps. Including mine (suddenlink), and the nations largest, Time Warner.

The other major provider with a cap is comcast, and it's an absurdly high 250 GB.

What ISP do you have with a 60GB cap? And what exactly "streaming video" are you watching?

Basically unless you're a huge pirate running multiple dozens of torrents of illegal material 24/7, you will never come close to any reasonable cap. And even then, those pirates are horders, downloading huge amounts of video they will never watch. NOBODY can possibly have enough hours in the day to watch 250 GB's of content in a month, and do much of ANYTHING else.

I'm on the net more than almost ANYBODY. Probably literally an average of 16 hours a day 4+ days a week. I watch a ton of streaming webcam sites (blogtv, stickam, ustream, etc), youtube, and the like. I got a program that tracks your bandwidth usage once out of curiosity. Turns out with the INSANE amount I use the internet, I used about 45 GB's that month.

Basically most people who exceed bandwidth caps disgust me. They're basically hording pirates with no jobs, and thats IT. The FACT is no reasonable person can even come CLOSE to any of these caps.

Another example is my phone...I have ATT's 2GB a month package. That's the same as unlimited for me. Despite that I do a decent amount of 3G websurfing, I rarely exceed 200 MB a month.

Granted a phone and a PC are different, but it should give you an idea what a ridiculous amount of data even 60GB is.


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