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Cites security issues

Apple has been critical of Adobe's Flash technologies for quite some time. In fact, Apple's CEO Steve Jobs published an "open letter" in April, bashing Flash for being a closed system and proprietary in nature. The company has been a strong proponent of HTML5 as an open source alternative to Flash.

Jobs was also critical of its power consumption when used in iPhones: "Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice… But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short."

The company has now declared war on Adobe, stating that it will no longer pre-install Adobe's Flash software on any of its products, including the latest iteration of the MacBook Air launched last week.

However, Apple is saying that this move is due to security issues rather than politics. The firm states that there was a risk of accidentally distributing obsolete versions by pre-installing Flash. The onus will now be on Mac users to download the most up-to-date version of the software themselves.

Apple points to a recent incident when an obsolete version of Flash with several known security vulnerabilities shipped with OS X 10.6, known as Snow Leopard. Similar thinking about security recently led the company to deprecate its own version of Java in favor of versions distributed by Oracle.


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Big deal.
By Dorkyman on 10/29/2010 11:39:46 AM , Rating: 2
So the first time the user goes to a page with Flash content (and enormous percentage of all pages) they will download Flash, taking a minute or so.

All the move demonstrates is a perverse refusal by senior Apple management (ahem) to deal with reality.




RE: Big deal.
By Motoman on 10/30/2010 11:55:34 AM , Rating: 2
...and it will probably scare the bejeezus out of anyone who's a likely candidate to buy a Mac in the first place.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer

















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