backtop


Print 20 comment(s) - last by FishTankX.. on Nov 2 at 11:48 PM


Leaf production underway in Japan  (Source: Nissan)
U.S. and UK plants production will start later

One of the most anticipated plug-in electric vehicles to be unveiled this year is the Nissan Leaf and we are getting closer to the launch date for the vehicle. Motor Trend reports that Leaf production has started in Japan and the plant building the EVs will be the model for future Leaf production facilities around the world.

The Leaf is being built in the Nissan Oppama facility in Japan which has a production capacity of 50,000 units right now. Presumably, that capacity can be increased in the future if needed. Once the vehicle is in full swing and the demand increases, Nissan will roll out similar assembly lines to plants in Smyrna, Tennessee and the Sunderland plant in England.

The U.S. assembly line will have a production capacity of 150,000 units per year at full tilt and the Sunderland plant will be good for 50,000 Leaf vehicles that will be used to meet demand in England and Europe. Nissan will take lessons learned in the assembly process at the Oppama facility and roll those tricks out to the other manufacturing plants as needed.

"Oppama will serve as the 'Mother Plant' for the production of Nissan Leaf," said Hidetoshi Imazu, Nissan's executive VP of manufacturing. "We will use all of the know-how and learnings from Oppama to ensure the highest quality at all sites that manufacture Nissan EVs."

Nissan revealed in March that the Leaf's price will be $32,780 before the $7,500 federal tax rebate. Nissan will also be offering a lease on the Leaf at $349 per month with the rebate coming to Nissan rather than the buyer.

The EV is good for 100 miles on a single charge and will have a top speed of 87 mph. Nissan is also reportedly considering offering Leaf buyers a rental car for longer trips when needed. 



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Small business opportunity.
By bobsmith1492 on 10/25/2010 2:13:02 PM , Rating: 2
Does this thing plug into 120V service for charging? If so, a 2KW generator is perfect. For a standard 15A breaker:
120V x 15A = 1800W


RE: Small business opportunity.
By Samus on 10/25/2010 2:24:18 PM , Rating: 2
I really have to question the logic of using a generator to recharge an electric vehicle. Even at peak, generators are only 80% efficient.


RE: Small business opportunity.
By Spuke on 10/25/2010 3:17:58 PM , Rating: 1
With a typical inverter generator, you'll need to convert back to DC to charge these batteries. Why do that? Just keep it DC and avoid the conversion losses. At home, you don't have a choice but if you're going to do this as a service, don't do it that way. Get yourself a 12hp Hatz diesel engine and pair it with a 300A alternator with an external multistage voltage regulator. That will cut down on the time and fuel usage over a generator.

PS - Probably won't work cause LI batteries require different charging protocols. I have no idea what those are.


RE: Small business opportunity.
By priusone on 10/25/2010 5:06:08 PM , Rating: 2
It's not about efficiency, it's about the "customer" being stranded on the side of the road with no more juice in their cells. The basic idea is to be able to charge someones batteries enough to get them home, slightly lighter in the pocketbook, of course.

I have the 2,000 watt generator for small time welding and for camping.


"I want people to see my movies in the best formats possible. For [Paramount] to deny people who have Blu-ray sucks!" -- Movie Director Michael Bay














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki