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Can GM sell 60,000 Volts in 2012?  (Source: GM)
GM is also working to reduce the MSRP of the Volt

GM has been touting its Volt extended range EV for years now and the vehicle finally close to hitting the U.S. market. The vehicle uses a gasoline generator to produce electricity to drive the wheels once the all-electric driving range is used up. GM has big plans for sales of the Volt, despite its relatively high $41,000 price tag.

The company has announced that it will build 10,000 to 15,000 Volts in 2011. That tidbit comes from GM global vehicle line executive for electric vehicles Doug Parks. Parks also told 
The Detroit News that in 2012, Volt production could be upped to as many as 60,000 vehicles. That announcement comes on the heels of GM updating the production capacity for the 2012 model year to 30,000 to 45,000.

Parks said, "Starting in '12, we'll be in this max rate of 60,000." Parks claims that GM could actually sell that many volts in 2012 and possibly even make more of the vehicles than the 60,000 number. Park told
The Detroit News, "We have the ability to increase volume and crank that up. We don't have any firm plans yet but we're flexible."

Park also stated that GM is in the process of finalizing the EPA fuel economy numbers and electric driving range for the Volt. He also admits that the final number could come in at under the 40-mile electric range mark that GM has been promising all these years. The final electric range number could be as low as 25 miles, however, Parks hopes that GM will "over deliver".

Park said that GM is working to reduce the $41,000 MSRP for the Volt as well. He said, "Our business model for the Volt is not finalized yet. We need to continue to make that (price) better as we go forward."



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RE: That won't be necessary.
By Flunk on 10/18/2010 12:02:59 PM , Rating: 3
If you want to look at it another way it's a hybrid version of the Chevy Cruz which is going to come in around the $16,000 mark. $25,000 is one hell of a premium to day for any hybrid system.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By Spuke on 10/18/2010 12:31:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
$25,000 is one hell of a premium to day for any hybrid system.
I agree. Too expensive but, IMO, they're all too expensive. I won't crap on the car until I see reviews though. Who am I kidding, I'm not in the market for a hybrid anyways.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By Dr of crap on 10/18/2010 12:34:51 PM , Rating: 2
Spuke - I think you are deluded.
In what world would you pay that much extra for what other cars can do for less?
What GREAT thing does the Volt have that the Prius or any other EV, BEV, hybrid, not have?
I for one am so tired of the media hype of this over priced piece.
Let's get it into production and see what the public thinks.
That IS WHAT matters after all - will it sell!
The ones who "don't know what the Volt has to offer" probably will be the buyers.
The SMART ones know what it has and will not!

And what great marketing by GM. First they say that there will be a limit on the production to drive up the "want" factor and get buyers on the list. Then come out and say that production will be much higher than first reported.

Still doesn't make me want to fork over my first born for one!


RE: That won't be necessary.
By bobsmith1492 on 10/18/2010 1:37:53 PM , Rating: 2
The great thing it has is that it can drive 40 miles on electric power, costing you no gas, AND it can run on gas for longer trips. No other vehicle can do that.

You must know that if you've ever read an article on the Volt. Otherwise GM is failing at advertising.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By Dr of crap on 10/18/10, Rating: -1
RE: That won't be necessary.
By bobsmith1492 on 10/18/2010 4:09:13 PM , Rating: 2
Right now you can buy a car that will get you 100 miles on electric power (Tesla, Nissan Leaf).

Or, you can buy a gas car (every other car out there).

No other car has the two combined properly with the benefits of each and no negatives from either: gas is easy to refill and readily available, while electricity is inexpensive and clean.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By knowom on 10/18/2010 4:24:22 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah it's clean...clean coal is more like it considering most electricity is produced by burning coal. If you happen to have solar, wind ,or hydroelectric power as your electricity you could consider it clean, but other wise that's just pure fudd for the misinformed drones.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By priusone on 10/19/2010 7:25:13 AM , Rating: 2
Yup, and coal is mined right here in the good ol US of A. Besides, how much fuel is burnt getting that petroleum across the Atlantic? I'd rather burn the coal for electricity than go to the pump. Especially since I rarely go over 20 miles in an average day.

And to the genius who mentioned the Tesla, I think those are slightly over $41,000 and once you are out of battery power, all you have to do in dig out the generator that you have in the passenger seat and wait for it to charge the batteries.


RE: That won't be necessary.
By Spuke on 10/18/2010 4:12:36 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In what world would you pay that much extra for what other cars can do for less?
Um...that's not what I said. No delusion here.


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