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Chevrolet Volt  (Source: truthaboutdomestics.com)

  (Source: globalmotors.net)
Installation costs an estimated $1,475

The Chevrolet Volt has been a hot topic since its concept debut in January 2007, and it has certainly come a long way since then. General Motors has been providing bits of news about the electric vehicle over time to help EV buyers consider the Volt.

Now, Chevrolet has released information regarding the cost of their Voltec 240V home charging station, which is set at $490Nissan released figures awhile ago regarding their home charging stations, which are set at $2,200 for the 220V including installation. 

The $490 for the Voltec 240V home charging unit was set by SPX Service Solutions, whom Chevrolet has an agreement with. SPX Service Solutions is a national provider of home charging installation equipment and services, and will be selling the Voltec 240V along with several other home charging stations.

Chevrolet notes that this is the most affordable 240V home charging system, and will be beneficial to Volt drivers because it only takes four hours to charge the electric battery from depleted to fully charged with a 240V station as opposed to the standard 120V charge cord, which takes 10 hours to complete the same task.

While Chevrolet's Voltec 240V home charging system is priced at $490, the installation of this system costs approximately $1,475. Though, Chevrolet adds that this price varies upon electrical requirements.  

Electric vehicles have been a popular subject, and with the upcoming release of EV pioneers like the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf, the interest and curiosity surrounding these vehicles has heightened. Over time, we've watched and waited as both of these EV heavyweights exposed their core features, such as the Volt's 40 miles of electric-only propulsion (which was recently revised to 25-50 miles) with a gasoline engine providing an additional 300 miles, and the Leaf's ability to travel 100 miles on a single charge.



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RE: Why so much?
By therealnickdanger on 10/7/2010 2:48:03 PM , Rating: 1
Harsh, not sure why you got rated down. Are we not students of history?

It wouldn't surprise me one bit if GM managed to get some extra "incentive" from Uncle Sam to cover the cost of the power station for customers (by union-only electricians). All GM has to do is approach Obama with some bogus focus study stating how no one will buy the car due to the additional set up costs... BAM -- Instant Obamamoney™ direct from Obama's Stash™! After all, that's the proper way to sell products, create jobs, and grow the economy.


RE: Why so much?
By rcc on 10/7/2010 5:07:30 PM , Rating: 5
Actually, reality proves that there are very few "students of history" among us. That's one of the reasons "we" keep making the same mistakes.

Actually, given the recent "tweaks" that academia has given to history, I don't know that being a casual student of history would help. You either need the drive to dig out what really happened, or be old enough to remember it.


RE: Why so much?
By douggrif on 10/7/2010 7:08:46 PM , Rating: 4
Let's see, electric powered cars carry a hefty premium over gas powered cars. Some of the premium will be covered by Federal tax rebates (guess who pays that?) and the rest is extra cost to the buyer. An estimated 90 percent of the rare earth metals necessary to produce the car batteries is mined and controlled by mainland China (communists). China recently refused to sell these rare earth metals to Japan (but that couldn't effect us). Australia has the only other major rare earth supply, but mining must be developed and will take about four years and lots of cash. China has recently bought significant mining shares in Australia (coinidence?).

Our current Federal Government makes policies which greatly limit our domestic oil exploration and production. Also, the Government has stopped all offshore drilling (cost about 20,000 jobs in Louisana alone). Roughly fourteen scarce drilling rigs have been sold to foreign governments including South American ones. Our Government has loaned billions of dollars to Brazil to help develop their off shore drilling in deep waters which we are forbidden to drill ourselves.

To summarize for our limited thinking young folk, we have done about everything possible to limit our own domestic power and fuel production (no new oil refineries since about 1977). We must now seek over 40 percent of our domestic oil needs from other sources (one of which is Canada which is good). But most of the world's oil supply must come from countries openly hostile to democratic governments (you know the ones who elect their leaders). It now appears that much of the very expensive electric alternative will be controlled by Chinese communists.

God Blessed our country with incredible energy resources which we have allowed to be tightly limited by godless politians. Why not develop our own energy resources and let the free market determine what source wins? Oh yeah, we must also be afraid of Global Warming (burr, it is cold outside). What is your opinion?


RE: Why so much?
By Reclaimer77 on 10/7/2010 9:15:07 PM , Rating: 2
Great post.


RE: Why so much?
By Spuke on 10/7/2010 11:00:37 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Let's see, electric powered cars carry a hefty premium over gas powered cars. Some of the premium will be covered by Federal tax rebates (guess who pays that?) and the rest is extra cost to the buyer. An estimated 90 percent of the rare earth metals necessary to produce the car batteries is mined and controlled by mainland China (communists). China recently refused to sell these rare earth metals to Japan (but that couldn't effect us). Australia has the only other major rare earth supply, but mining must be developed and will take about four years and lots of cash. China has recently bought significant mining shares in Australia (coinidence?). Our current Federal Government makes policies which greatly limit our domestic oil exploration and production. Also, the Government has stopped all offshore drilling (cost about 20,000 jobs in Louisana alone). Roughly fourteen scarce drilling rigs have been sold to foreign governments including South American ones. Our Government has loaned billions of dollars to Brazil to help develop their off shore drilling in deep waters which we are forbidden to drill ourselves. To summarize for our limited thinking young folk, we have done about everything possible to limit our own domestic power and fuel production (no new oil refineries since about 1977). We must now seek over 40 percent of our domestic oil needs from other sources (one of which is Canada which is good). But most of the world's oil supply must come from countries openly hostile to democratic governments (you know the ones who elect their leaders). It now appears that much of the very expensive electric alternative will be controlled by Chinese communists.
Reposting this because I think it's good reading.


RE: Why so much?
By gjk392 on 10/8/2010 10:47:12 AM , Rating: 2
you hit the nail on the head here. great post !


RE: Why so much?
By therealnickdanger on 10/8/2010 10:55:27 AM , Rating: 2
FTW


RE: Why so much?
By rvd2008 on 10/8/2010 11:51:02 AM , Rating: 3
Ignorance is a bliss?

90% of crap we buy today came from China, did you know that?
Check your Wall-mart or Apple store. Boo! Communists took over American retailers years ago.

FYI, refineries do not produce oil. So boosting their numbers will do zilch to oil production bottom line.

Finally, EV battery uses Li, Fe, Mn, etc, which are not rare earth metals. Get your facts straight, little .edu will not hurt.


RE: Why so much?
By douggrif on 10/8/2010 6:58:57 PM , Rating: 4
Regarding your belief that China rare earth metals are not critical to EV battery production. Please sir, just google {"rare earth" china batteries}. You will learn a valuable lesson.

Example: http://michellemalkin.com/2010/10/05/china-the-rar...

Enjoy learning and please vote in November!


RE: Why so much?
By Kurz on 10/8/2010 7:08:06 PM , Rating: 2
Heh... the magnets in the Electric motors are Rare Earths.


RE: Why so much?
By Souka on 10/8/2010 11:54:43 AM , Rating: 2
I think you're likely a Republican or just anti-government

There, that's my opinion! :)


RE: Why so much?
By hsew on 10/9/2010 1:50:53 AM , Rating: 4
so either way, you're saying that he has a brain and his opinions haven't been bought by the government.


RE: Why so much?
By Lerianis on 10/9/2010 2:27:25 PM , Rating: 3
Yet I point it out again: China is NOT a communist country. They are an elitist country masquerading as a communist country.


RE: Why so much?
By JonB on 10/9/2010 11:01:33 AM , Rating: 3
History. There are so many histories from which to choose.

Have you read some of the history books used in schools to educate children? They are forced to use history books approved by a panel of legislators (politicians), not actual historians. Teachers will be reprimanded if they introduce other, conflicting viewpoints.


"The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak." -- Robert Heinlein














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