backtop


Print 33 comment(s) - last by Smilin.. on Oct 5 at 10:37 AM


Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer
Microsoft's CEO is full of colorful, yet insightful commentary

Interviews with Microsoft's vocal chief executive, Steve Ballmer, are always entertaining.  A recent chat with The Seattle Times' Sharon Pian Chan was no exception.

In response to a question about Google CEO Eric Schmidt saying Bing was Google's chief competitor, and "a well-run, highly competitive search engine", Mr. Ballmer enthuses, "Welcome to our world, man. It's a competitive world out there. We're competing, other guys are going to compete with them. We have good competitors. Apple is a good competitor, Google is a good competitor, Oracle is a good competitor, VMware is a good competitor. We partner with Facebook, but we also compete in some dimensions with them. Hey, it's OK, just get out there and work. ... We're his best competitor, and we're a very good competitor and we're going to do a very good job."

While he might be excited to "welcome" Google to "his" world of search/competition (two things Google seems pretty well acquainted with already), he also talked about a more sober topic -- Kin.  The Kin phone project was a massive failure, with perhaps under 10,000 handsets sold after millions in investment and engineering costs.

In the interview Mr. Ballmer admits that Kin was a mess, commenting, "The No. 1 message from Kin is a message of focus. You only get so many things you can really talk about, communicate, work on with the consumer. You've got to be bold, you've got to look forward and you've got to stay focused. Kin was neither -- with 20-20 hindsight -- bold enough relative to where the market's going, and it just defocused activity from Windows Phone."

While certainly a colorful character, Mr. Ballmer seems to have a good feel about Microsoft's most promising upcoming products at least.  He states that "Windows Phone 7 or Kinect or IE9 (Internet Explorer 9)" are some of Microsoft's most exciting upcoming offerings."

Mr. Ballmer is also eagerly awaiting the launch of Windows slates to take on the iPad.

When asked about how long he would stay with the company, he replies, "I don't know. I'm working away doing the best job I know how to do. The company continues to grow. Outside my family, this is my baby. I want to make sure that, whenever I go, the baby's in great health. It's not a baby, it must be at least a teenager by now, young adult. I want to make sure the place is in very good shape."

And apparently Mr. Ballmer has a real Facebook (though there are numerous imposter Ballmer pages -- 11 by his count).  How often does he check his Facebook?  "Every day."



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Search?
By lwatcdr on 10/1/2010 10:53:40 AM , Rating: 2
Word was a better Windows word processor than WordPerfect but I wouldn't dismiss WordPerfect as a bad product.
Excel was a better Windows and Mac Spreadsheet then Lotus.
Both WordPerfect and Lotus 123 had the same problem. They had to maintain backward compatibility with there massive installed customer base. With Lotus you could see the problem coming for years when they failed to produce a good Mac Product. I used a very early version of Word for DOS. Yes there was Word for DOS and nobody wanted it. Everybody wanted WordPerfect or Wordstar.
So in that case I will give you Microsoft did do better.
Novell I will not give you. Microsoft partnered with them and then killed them.

Yes Microsoft can compete but they have ZERO excuse to fail. They are the biggest software firm on the planet and dominate the OS and Office suite market.
As far as developer tools goes well the wrote the stinking OS so that does give them a big advantage. It did take them long enough to get it right. For decades the where following and copying Borland trying to compete. Any one else remember Quick C?


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki