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Renovations aim to streamline space operations for the Orion Project.

Plans have been set in motion to get the nation's next space exploration vehicle prepared for flight. Lockheed Martin announced this week that they have a crew on-site at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to began lean assembly path-finding operations for the Orion spacecraft.   

A full-scale Orion mock-up is being used to conduct simulated manufacturing and assembly operations to verify the tools, processes and spacecraft integration procedures.  

The finished product is expected to be fully assembled by Lockheed Martin on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center according to a press release from the company.

"The unique benefit of this complete on-site operation is that we will build the spacecraft and then move it directly onto the launch vehicle at KSC, which saves the government transportation costs associated with tests and checkout prior to launch,” said Lockheed Martin Orion Deputy Program Manager for production operations Richard Harris. “This capability also facilitates the KSC workforce transition efforts by providing new job opportunities for those employees completing their shuttle program assignments."

To help support NASA's next generation spacecraft fleet, Lockheed Martin and NASA worked together in a two-year effort on renovations for the Operations & Checkout Facility at the Kennedy Space Center.  

The collaboration produced a new and improved "O&C".  Paperless workstations, a portable clean room system, portable tooling stations, and air-bearing floor space were some of the upgrades that resulted in the state-of-the-art complex being dubbed the “the spacecraft factory of the future”.  

Lockheed Martin
 is currently the prime contractor to NASA for the Orion Project.



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RE: I'm sorry...
By Callmeaslut on 9/23/2010 10:18:21 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
But I think your wrong about how this reflects on the current administration. I think the current president is very interested in the development of technology that will allow us to get off our little rock. The problem is that we spend a lot of money to do it right now, and right now money is tight. The vision for the future space program is to be driven by the private sector which is arguably the best way to drive down costs and make space travel a more regular thing for the private sector.


Baloney. You sound like a spokesperson for the Obama administration. This IS 1960's technology. It's a tin can with an ablative shield on the bottom. Oh, and it holds more astronauts. Still fail.

In the scheme of things, a few more billion dollars for the space program will pay off in spades - with or without private carriers.

Speaking of private carriers, have you seen their offerings? - pitiful. Take a few private citizens to the edge of space to free fall again?

As I said earlier, there is no clear direction. And a lack of funding. We are going nowhere very slowly...


RE: I'm sorry...
By Jeffk464 on 9/23/2010 11:03:05 AM , Rating: 2
His statement is not Baloney, we are learning way way more about the universe from NASA's and Europe's unmanned programs.


RE: I'm sorry...
By Jeffk464 on 9/23/2010 11:10:33 AM , Rating: 5
P.S. I too am a little pissed off that Obama would rather spend money on welfare queens than on NASA. We get zero payback on the welfare queen budget, unless you count the future gangbangers they produce.


RE: I'm sorry...
By CarbonJoe on 9/24/2010 12:35:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
We get zero payback on the welfare queen budget, unless you count the future Democratic voters they produce.


Fixed that for ya.


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