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  (Source: Lockheed Martin)
The Israeli government will receive a first order of 20 JSF by the end of 2015, with

Israel is still considering whether or not it wants to purchase the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II (also known as the Joint Strike Fighter) aircraft, as Defense Minister Ehud Barak and other Israeli government officials discuss the expensive investment.

Previous approval granted Israel the right to purchase 75 JSFs, but Israel initially only wants just 20 aircraft.  The country expects to pay more than $140 million for each F-35, and it's unknown if Israel will be able to install all of its own equipment into the aircraft.

Previously, the U.S. government said it would remove some of its own hardware and offer an alternative or allow the purchasing nation to make slight alternations.  Continued negotiations take place, but it's likely Israel will fulfill the rest of its order after the first 20 aircraft are accepted.

"We work according to the assumption that other countries will receive the jet, and that is why we need to be the first,” an IDF officer recently disclosed.  "The JSF not only provides unbelievable capabilities, but will also assist Israel in boosting its deterrence.”

After agreed upon configurations, Israel will begin to receive its new aircraft by the end of 2015, with future orders expected to arrive shortly after.  Although there are some early contract problems, Israel and the United States are expected to come to a fair agreement as quickly as possible.

Lockheed Martin has been given approval to sell the aircraft to select countries, but cannot offer certain electronics and hardware aboard the aircraft.

The Australian military is interested in purchasing up to 100 JSF, but want to see additional testing information before purchasing the costly aircraft.  If an agreement with Lockheed cannot be finalized, it's possible Australia will work with Russia.  Canada is expected to purchase up to 65 JSF -- negotiations are ongoing with other countries as well.



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RE: For consideration
By FITCamaro on 8/13/2010 12:13:07 PM , Rating: 2
Well honestly there's not much more danger from that happening if a country like Israel has the code than if they don't. An employee at Lockheed or one of the various subcontractors working on the jet is just as likely to give the code to someone who shouldn't have it as those in Israel who might have access to it.

Honestly I don't see how they could go through all the code that is going to be on the jet in order to be certain there are no such back doors.

But most countries who will be getting the F35 are just getting the jet. They aren't getting all the critical electronics that the US will have. So while I guess there could be back doors to say, shut off the fuel system, Israel and other countries being worried that we're going to be able to disarm their weapons is unfounded.


RE: For consideration
By SPOOFE on 8/13/2010 7:54:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Honestly I don't see how they could go through all the code that is going to be on the jet in order to be certain there are no such back doors.

Maybe add some backdoors of their own, in the event that the tech is stolen from them specifically?


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