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Print 20 comment(s) - last by phryguy.. on Aug 11 at 4:07 AM

Toyota plans to sell 1 million hybrids per year this decade

The first mass production hybrid vehicle, the Prius, came from Toyota in the late 1990s. The Prius was soon joined by several other hybrid vehicles in the Japanese market including larger SUVs and vehicles aimed at commercial use. Today, Toyota offers hybrid vehicles from its luxury brand Lexus in the U.S. along with the Prius, Camry Hybrid, and Highlander Hybrid.

Toyota Motor Company (TMC) has announced that in Japan the sales of hybrid vehicles have topped the million unit mark. The Prius was also the best selling vehicle in Japan in 2009.

Globally, Toyota has sold over 2.68 million hybrid vehicles as of July 31, 2010. The company currently sells eight hybrid vehicles outside Japan with overseas sales for TMC at 1.68 million units. According to Toyota, its hybrid vehicles have resulted in some significant savings in greenhouse gas emissions. TMC figures that since 1997, its hybrids have resulted in four million less tons of CO2 emissions in Japan alone and 15 million fewer tons of CO2 produced globally.

Toyota has bigger plans still for its hybrid vehicle sales. The company plans to sell a million hybrid vehicles per year during this decade and add hybrid models to every vehicle in its line as early as 2020. Toyota's iconic Prius hybrid was launched in 1997. More recently, Toyota and electric vehicle maker Tesla have worked together on a new plant and the development of hybrid and full-electric vehicles.

There were also reports in May that a minivan using Prius hybrid technology would be coming next spring.



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RE: How does a Prius save petrol?
By mmcdonalataocdotgov on 8/10/2010 11:32:12 AM , Rating: 2
I just wanted to add that in a regular gas only car, energy is lost to heat when the car brakes. It is gone. In a hybrid vehicle, that lost energy is turned into electric energy. That is where the hybrid gets the battery power (predominantly.) The only time it takes energy from the gas motor is when the battery gets very low, or when the gas motor is running anyway but there is no load on it (over 45 mph).

The upshot is that I get 50+ mpg in my hybrid where I would get about 30 in a regular ICE car of the same dimensions.

It is not tricky thermodynamics. The hybrid just recaptures energy that the gas engine was p*ssing away anyway. An elegant solution.


RE: How does a Prius save petrol?
By phryguy on 8/11/2010 4:07:26 AM , Rating: 2
The other replies covered it pretty well.

The person asking should also see these for reference:
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/new-cars/b...
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/new-cars/b...
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/new-cars/b...

These are in smaller US gallons in Consumer Reports testing and are not from our EPA test nor the are they comparable to that of European test driving cycles.

44 (miles per US gallon) = 52.8418186 miles per Imperial gallon
32 (miles per US gallon) = 38.4304135 miles per Imperial gallon
55 (miles per US gallon) = 66.0522732 miles per Imperial gallon
53 (miles per US gallon) = 63.6503724 miles per Imperial gallon

There are also not "hundreds of kilos of extra mass". The HV battery in the Prius only weighs 53.3 kg. See http://www.myprius.co.za/technical.htm.

My 06 Prius is only 2890 lbs. which is actually fairly light for car classified by the EPA as a medium sized car. Most non-hybrid 4-banger family sedans off that era weigh 3000+ lbs.

5% efficiency of regenerative braking sounds WAY off. Where is 95% of the energy lost? That makes no sense. Even internal combustion engines don't have such poor efficiency. Also, one might want to look at http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/atv.shtml.


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