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A CDMA iPhone is reportedly being produced by new Taiwanese supplier Pegatron and will launch on the Verizon network during the holiday season.  (Source: Phonedog)

In other news the iPhone's hardware chief, Mark Papermaster, has reportedly been fired. It's unclear whether his imposed exodus from Apple was in part due to antennagate or if something else was afoot.  (Source: Edible Apple)
Change is in the air for the Apple iPhone

Need proof that iPhone exclusivity in the U.S. is about to go the way of the dodo?  Look no further than second place U.S. wireless carrier AT&T's U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing which assures investors that sales will continue strong even "as these exclusivity arrangements end."  To help remove any ambiguity of what it might be talking about, the report goes on to state, "We believe offering a wide variety of handsets reduces dependence on any single handset."

Apple appears on the verge of finally embracing multiple carriers within the U.S., adopting the approach that, in part, allowed Android to surge ahead of it in the U.S. smartphone market.  

But to jump to the number one and number three carriers in the U.S., Verizon and Sprint, Apple must first produce a CDMA-capable iPhone (the current iPhone works on GSM, a rival technology). 

According to a June report from 
Digitimes, Apple has a CDMA iPhone 4 designed and tested.  What's more, reportedly the company is ditching troubled supplier Foxconn, instead awarding the CDMA iPhone 4 manufacturing contract to Taiwanese-owned rival Pegatron (to be fair, if this holds true, it may merely be because Foxconn does not currently have the additional capacity to handle the contract).

The phone reportedly will ship in Q4 2010 -- just in time for the holiday season.  
Bloomberg also previously reported that a CDMA iPhone is on its way, jumping to Verizon and possibly Sprint.  Another report indicates that T-Mobile will officially pick up the iPhone, as well, which currently is only available to customers who jailbreak and unlock iPhones.

A jump to the rest of America's top carriers -- including the nation's largest carrier, Verizon -- could yield a massive surge in iPhone subscribers and big profits for Apple and its new wireless partners alike.  If Apple can get its antenna problems under control, that is.

Speaking of the iPhone hardware, it appears that Mark Papermaster has seen the last of his days in Cupertino.  The top executive, who came to Apple after a fierce legal battle with former employer IBM over his contract, has reportedly been canned.

The news was first reported by 
The New York Times.

Apple insider John Gruber, who runs the blog 
Daring Fireball, first suggests that Papermaster was released for the iPhone 4 antenna debacle, writing:

From what I’ve heard, it’s clear he was sacked. Papermaster was a conspicuous absence at the Antennagate press conference. Inside Apple, he’s “the guy responsible for the antenna” — that’s a quote from a source back on July 23.

But then seems to recant, posting the next day:

Does Apple have a “make one mistake and you’re fired” policy? No. But, if the mistake is big enough, sometimes yes. But I don’t even know whether the iPhone 4 antenna is the only thing that led to Papermaster’s sacking.
...It’s Mansfield, not Papermaster, who appears in Apple’s six-minute iPhone 4 promotional video — and that video was shot weeks (months?) before the iPhone 4 was unveiled....
But maybe Papermaster was already on the outs, and Mansfield was already overseeing the engineering of things like the Retina Display and the A4.
...
One last tidbit from an informed source: the bug on the “touching it wrong” signal loss issue was filed two years ago. This is not a problem they didn’t catch, or caught too late. So, on the one hand, clearly the fundamental antenna design predated Papermaster’s time at the company. But on the other hand, there was plenty of time to find a solution to the problem. I.e., it’s not that Apple should not have used an external antenna. It’s that it should have been even better.

Of numerous Apple-centric writers, Gruber has some of the best inside access to Apple, so if he doesn't know exactly why Papermaster is sacked, it's clear that just about no one does.  One thing's clear, though -- the iPad/iPhone/iPod hardware team is moving on and Papermaster isn't part of that process.



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RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By dark matter on 8/9/2010 2:47:52 AM , Rating: 5
If he really did make the decision to go ahead, yes they should dump him as it appears he has stopped listening to reason. Fanboyism will only get you so far in the market and a CEO who believes they are infallible is most certainly a liability rather than an asset, especially given Apples rather inflated price tag.


RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By MrBlastman on 8/9/2010 8:32:57 AM , Rating: 3
Typical Apple... You report a bug or security problem and they just bury it for years!


By kaoken on 8/9/2010 9:35:11 AM , Rating: 2
That's because at apple we don't beleive in virsuses.


RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By guffwd13 on 8/9/10, Rating: -1
RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By MrBlastman on 8/9/2010 12:22:21 PM , Rating: 4
Whoa, you are so full of crap that Steve would be proud!

quote:
devices to make sure they "just work"- and they do (more so than windows boxes anyway...)


Say what? While I have had my share of problems with Windows boxes, I have had MORE than enough problems with my wife's crapbook (err, macbook). Lets see, where do I start... Oh, my favorite problem as of late...

The battery, yes, the battery--is so bad, that it dies every 1 1/2 years, like clockwork, no matter what we're doing with the computer. Yes, after a year and a half, the battery just suddenly, inexplicably... dies. No reason at all. The first one was warrantied, the second one I had to push to get it covered and the third we bit the bullet on and had to pay for a new one.

All this time my Dell laptop has had the same, original stock battery for the last five years.

How about the power adaptor? Our crapbook has been through THREE power adaptors in a little over four years, the thing keeps dying on us randomly. To replace them, we have to shell out a big hunk of money. But wait, the magnetic-connector is an engineering marvel in the acolytes of Job's eyes--well, a marvel of hardware failures, maybe.

What about randomly dissapearing data? Our macbook has had that too, but, for the sake of not rampaging about how much I now loathe this company, I'll stop there.

Work? You need to reassess your reality because obviously you aren't living in it.


RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By guffwd13 on 8/9/10, Rating: -1
RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By MrBlastman on 8/9/2010 3:26:49 PM , Rating: 2
Wait a minute...

quote:
And as people in the past have pointed out before, the hardware is all the same (they were defending windows boxes to say Mac hardware is the same stuff so it can't be better than windows, but not worse either).


You said that, then say this:

quote:
I wasn't referring to the hardware anyway


Yet in your previous post, you said thus:

quote:
He has been so annal retentive over the performance of his machines and devices to make sure they "just work"-


It sounds to me like you were indeed trying to reference the hardware and now you are trying to backtrack your statement given the culpability I have shown due to my own experiences with Mac hardware... Or were you not? Which is it?

Looks like you are taking a lesson from Steve's handbook and applying it directly here through "deny, deny, deny, then ignore."

Mac OS, while based off of BSD loosely, is not the greatest thing ever written. We've had our share of problems on the Macbook due to the OS and we've even had it wipe files from the filesystem in conjunction with Apple's own software. But wait, I thought it was perfect?

quote:
there is no one who can criticize his ingenuity on how to run a business


Yes there is, you're reading a post from him right now. Yes, Steve is a shining example of how to run a business, employing hundreds of thousands of suicidal workers in China who hate their existence because they are forced to work 29+ hours in a single shift, then given 8 hours offtime only to come back and work another full day--without ever being given permission to sit down. Shining example of a great philosophy, especially when they work a whole month and still can't afford to buy a single phone. But wait, you'll say they outsourced this labor to Foxconn...

Well I have news for you, a company is the sum of its parts, and contracted parts are still parts. Steve stinks, Apple stinks and Apple fans, they stink quite a bit as well. Perhaps Steve should learn a lesson from Microsoft, who has been in the hotseat for years: If your customers get irritated about something, own up to it, admit it, then fix it.

They are not the perfect, untouchable company that you think they are. To steal one of your own quotes:

quote:
Looks like we have another fanboy here.


RE: Papermaster just the fall guy...
By guffwd13 on 8/9/2010 5:09:22 PM , Rating: 1
In no way am I defending Apple's business practices nor promoting the facade of hip, sylish and green that Apple skins over the inner workings. They are, and he is, in no way untouchable.

You don't need to be a good person to be a good businessmen. In fact, good people tend to make poor businessmen - sadly enough. In no way am I defending Steve's character nor do I believe in any way that he's the greatest thing that ever was.

What I do know is that he has led an immensely successful company with brilliant idea one after another. The iPod was his idea as was his monopolistic integration with iTunes which even Ballmer said was brilliant.

He also single-handedly (well he and Ives) redesigned the product consumers desire. Things were well designed in the 1950s 1960s and then were designed to be cheap and inexpensive (and ugly!) for 30 years, before he reintroduced the notion of coveting a product for both its function and style. Its the fact that Michael Graves and Target, Samsung, Sony et al. and many other fun products that do what we need and look the way we want that I also appreciate him for.

Call me a Libertarian, but if sacrifices need to be made for the advancement (even if it ultimately comes from outside of Apple) of our technology and society, then they were necessary sacrifices. Or else, why even bother?

quote:
Well I have news for you, a company is the sum of its parts, and contracted parts are still parts. Steve stinks, Apple stinks and Apple fans, they stink quite a bit as well. Perhaps Steve should learn a lesson from Microsoft, who has been in the hotseat for years: If your customers get irritated about something, own up to it, admit it, then fix it.


While his deny, deny method is in full force, there are rumors that an iPhone 4.5 is in the works and will be released ahead of schedule. Whether thats true or not, believe me, the antenna issue will not only be fixed, but exceed the performance of many other if not all phones in G5. It'll be portrayed as the "person who fell but then rose up to triumph again" scheme that the average joe loves to see. It'll be such good marketing, that it may in fact have been intentional.

Good man Steve jobs? Maybe not. Good businessman? Absofrickin'lutely.


By klutzInMotion on 8/10/2010 9:45:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Call me a Libertarian, but if sacrifices need to be made for the advancement (even if it ultimately comes from outside of Apple) of our technology and society, then they were necessary sacrifices. Or else, why even bother?
I don't know about the workers in China, but sacrificing you will definitely advance our society.


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